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Tales from the Perilous Realm de J.R.R.…
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Tales from the Perilous Realm (edició 2008)

de J.R.R. Tolkien

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888817,991 (4.09)28
Never before published in a single volume, Tolkien's four novellas (Farmer Giles of Ham, Leaf by Niggle, Smith of Wootton Major, and Roverandom) and one book of poems (The Adventures of Tom Bombadil) are gathered together for the first time, in a fully illustrated volume. This new, definitive collection of works -- which had appeared separately, in various formats, between 1949 and 1998 -- comes with a brand-new foreword and endmatter, and with a series of detailed pencil illustrations by Alan Lee.… (més)
Membre:KRaySaulis
Títol:Tales from the Perilous Realm
Autors:J.R.R. Tolkien
Informació:Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (2008), Edition: F First Printing, Hardcover, 432 pages
Col·leccions:Llista de desitjos, Per llegir
Valoració:
Etiquetes:to-read

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Tales from the Perilous Realm de J. R. R. Tolkien

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I listened to the audiobook version of Tales from the Perilous Realm, which has the following contents:

Roverandom - 3.5 stars. A charming, cute, but meandering and somewhat repititious story about a dog who crosses a wizard, is transformed into a toy, and seeks to be changed back. This one would probably be better read as a picture book to children, as there are many scenes that would make for great illustrations.

Farmer Giles of Ham - 4.5 stars. The best story in the collection. After a farmer accidentally scares off a giant, he gains a big reputation and is called upon to defend the kingdom from a dragon. The dragon's personality, by turns lazy, sly, comical, or fearsome, helps make the story.

The Adventures of Tom Bombadil - 2 stars. A collection of rhyming poems set in the countryside of Middle Earth. There are some very good ones (I'm particularly fond of the Man in the Moon poem), but they appear in The Lord of the Rings, so they were not new to me. The new poems are unremarkable and a bit tiresome.

Smith of Wootton Major - 3 stars. Very much a faery story in the classic sense, but the fey here are pretty mild and uninteresting (in contrast to more nuanced treatment in works like Spinning Silver or White Wolf's Changeling). On the whole, it lacked emotional weight or interesting plot.

Leaf by Niggle - 3 stars. A rather abstract story about a painter in a countryside that turns out to be a sort of authoritarian state or dream sequence. Very unusual for Tolkien, reminiscent of stories by Borges, Poe's "The Pit and the Pendulum" (with dramatically toned-down horror), or the TV show "Lost." It felt like Tolkien experimenting in a genre that other authors do better.

Unfortunately, the audiobook did not include the essay "On Fairy-stories," which I was hoping to listen to. ( )
  jrissman | Jun 30, 2020 |
I'd read several pieces here before, but not all, and decades ago. The essay "On Fairy-stories" is the best, though here relegated to Appendix. It is the only essay, and several of the remaining short fiction works are worth revisiting.

"On Fairy-stories" discusses the role of fantasy for culture, and how it is misunderstood by many (especially critics?) who take it as juvenile or non-literary or both. Tolkien's position of "sub-creation" strikes me as another expression of Cabell's Romance, and to similar purpose and value. Tolkien rejects much scholarship on fairy-stories, not as invalid but as useless for either enjoying or writing a story about Faerie. Such scholarship is better for answering questions outside the tale, as it is irrelevant whether an event "really happened", or whether a scene reflected historical personages or legal doctrines. Rather, the stories arise from story-making (using metaphor "Cauldron of Story") and the aspects of a fantasy story which matter are those which work as story. Tolkien finishes with some reflections on what story is good for, all of these sensible and persuasive and wholly Cabellian. (His epilogue on the eucatastrophe of the Christian story he admits is "dangerous" and also revealing of what aspects of his fiction share in his own Christian beliefs.)

Tokien's dislike of allegory is infamous, and he had his reasons but does not mention them in this essay. Interestingly, the one mention of allegory is approving if incidental, in thinking of Greek myths when illustrating natural phenomena as better understood as allegory, not as myth.

I'm left motivated to read his other essays, perhaps especially those on Beowulf and his thoughts on invented language.

Of the short fiction, most memorable from my first reading was "Leaf by Niggle", and it did not disappoint upon re-reading. I enjoyed both "Farmer Giles" and "Smith of Wootton Major", somewhat moreso than expected even as (perhaps directly following from the fact) I'd not remembered any detail of either's plot nor of character. "Smith" is more poignant and Dunsanian than "Giles", and for me the lost gem.

I also appreciated the Bombadil poems, but in this case very specifically as vague backstory. Some of these seemed shoehorned into the Bombadil character, or their alleged source The Red Book: for example, "The Errantry", quite near to becoming that type of Elizabethan fairy story Tolkien admits to loathing, or several poems which seem something Bombadil might share when entertaining hobbits, not verse telling us of the character or his world. (Shippey confirms several of these suspicions, and Tolkien almost apologises for them in a framing preamble.)

"Roverandom" I need not revisit, it comes across very much as a children's story and not the variety I'm still fond of reading. I don't think I would have much liked it as a child, either.

//

Alan Lee's illustrations (and his afterward) are welcome, but unnecessary. It comes down to whether you admire Lee's interpretation of Tolkien's world, or do not: I do.

Tom Shippey's Introduction valuable and full of spoilers, regrettable the editor did not swap his & Lee's contributions, allowing the reader to proceed from first page to last, as a book naturally suggests. ( )
  elenchus | Jun 20, 2020 |
Great collection of Tolkien short stories. I had previously read Farmer Giles of Ham, The Adventures of Tom Bombadil, and Smith of Wootton Major, but Roverandom and Leaf by Niggle were new; as well as the essay/lecture Tolkien wrote/gave titled 'On Faery-Stories'. Both Roverandom and Leaf by Niggle were good stories (though Roverandom was better), and the essay was a good scholarly write-up on fantasy/fairy-tales/etc. as of Tolkien's time. Definitely worth a read. ( )
  BenKline | Sep 27, 2016 |
it was pretty good! I liked reading these - gave some insight on other things Tolkien's written. ( )
  katieloucks | Feb 26, 2016 |
This collection of several of Tolkien’s shorter works includes “Roverandom”, “Farmer Giles of Ham”, and “Tree and Leaf by Niggle” among others. From a story written by Tolkien for one of his sons who had lost a toy dog at the beach to a collection of hobbit songs and poems, this collection ranges from children’s bedtime tales a story that, from the beginning Latin name, is a humorous effort aimed at Tolkien’s Oxford peers. The stories are brief, engaging, and many provide examples of Tolkien’s fictional work outside his writings of Arda. ( )
  Ailinel | Jun 7, 2015 |
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» Afegeix-hi altres autors (18 possibles)

Nom de l'autorCàrrecTipus d'autorObra?Estat
Tolkien, J. R. R.autor primaritotes les edicionsconfirmat
Juva, KerstiTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Lee, AlanIl·lustradorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Lee, AlanEpílegautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Martin, AliceTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Pekkanen, PanuTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Shippey, TomIntroduccióautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Sisättö, VesaTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
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Faerie is a perilous land, and in it are pitfalls for the unwary and dungeons for the overbold . . . The realm of fairy-story is wide and deep and high and filled with many things: all manner of beasts and birds are found there; shoreless seas and stars uncounted; beauty that is an enchantment, and an ever-present peril; both joy and sorrow as sharp as swords. In that realm a man may, perhaps, count himself fortunate to have wandered, but its very richness and strangeness tie the tongue of a traveller who would report them. And while he is there it is dangerous for him to ask too many questions, lest the gates should be shut and the keys be lost.
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Of the history of the Little Kingdom few fragments have survived; but by chance an account of its origin has been preserved: a legend, perhaps, rather than an account; for it is evidently a late compilation, full of marvels, derived not from sober annals, but from the popular lays to which its author frequently refers.
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This work contains:

Farmer Giles of Ham
Leaf by Niggle
The Adventures of Tom Bombadil
Smith of Wootton Major
Roverandom
and
On Fairy-stories, as an appendix in some editions

Please do not combine with other collections having different contents.
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Never before published in a single volume, Tolkien's four novellas (Farmer Giles of Ham, Leaf by Niggle, Smith of Wootton Major, and Roverandom) and one book of poems (The Adventures of Tom Bombadil) are gathered together for the first time, in a fully illustrated volume. This new, definitive collection of works -- which had appeared separately, in various formats, between 1949 and 1998 -- comes with a brand-new foreword and endmatter, and with a series of detailed pencil illustrations by Alan Lee.

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