IniciGrupsConversesMésTendències
Cerca al lloc
Aquest lloc utilitza galetes per a oferir els nostres serveis, millorar el desenvolupament, per a anàlisis i (si no has iniciat la sessió) per a publicitat. Utilitzant LibraryThing acceptes que has llegit i entès els nostres Termes de servei i política de privacitat. L'ús que facis del lloc i dels seus serveis està subjecte a aquestes polítiques i termes.
Hide this

Resultats de Google Books

Clica una miniatura per anar a Google Books.

Nothing to Be Frightened of de Julian Barnes
S'està carregant…

Nothing to Be Frightened of (2008 original; edició 2009)

de Julian Barnes (Autor)

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaMencions
1,1074013,783 (3.78)38
Julian Barnes new book is, among many things, a family memoir, an exchange with his brother (a philosopher), a meditation on mortality and the fear of death, a celebration of art, an argument with and about God, and a homage to the French writer Jules Renard.
Membre:MattSalts
Títol:Nothing to Be Frightened of
Autors:Julian Barnes (Autor)
Informació:Vintage Books USA (2009), 256 pages
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca
Valoració:
Etiquetes:No n'hi ha cap

Detalls de l'obra

Nothing to Be Frightened Of de Julian Barnes (2008)

S'està carregant…

Apunta't a LibraryThing per saber si aquest llibre et pot agradar.

No hi ha cap discussió a Converses sobre aquesta obra.

» Mira també 38 mencions

Es mostren 1-5 de 40 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Roughly halfway through Nothing to be Frightened of, author Julian Barnes reveals how the word “nothing” in the book’s title should be understood. It is not meant in the way that a parent might reassure a scared child. No, it is literally “nothing” that Barnes finds frightening. He writes on the first page of the book, “I don’t believe in God, but I miss him.” That’s part of the nothing, but Barnes’s disbelief in the existence of God has a corollary: when we die, there is, afterward, “nothing.” Perhaps this doesn’t frighten him exactly. Rather, it conjures up a void into which he unblinkingly stares and finds discomfiting.
There is one thing that seems to frighten him more than what might (but probably doesn’t) happen after death. What worries him instead is what happens before: dying.
The exploration of these intertwined themes takes the form of an extended essay. It is a discursive ramble that draws on the author’s own life and family as well as a recounting of how various writers and composers have dealt with dying and death. Many of them are French authors he admires, especially Jules Renard.
To counter the notion that a life well-lived may inure one to a bad (that is terrifying) death, Barnes refers to the terror and agitation of Goethe’s final hours. As Barnes recounts it, even the best-lived life of accomplishment and acclaim is not free from the horrors awaiting us at its end. I don’t know how I’ll feel in my last hours, so I write the following with hesitation, but did those few hours of mortal fear really cancel out the many years that preceded it? In other words: yes, we all die, but as a rule, before that, we live.
So I came away from this book more sanguine than Barnes about the fact that dying is the reverse face of living. Perhaps my DNA is wired to accept the inevitability of my death with a little more equanimity than Barnes can. Nevertheless, I enjoyed reading this book and considering the questions it raises.
In addition to meditating on dying, death, and the (non-) existence of God, this book also offers insight into the craft of the novelist, both through direct reflection as well as through the way in which this informal memoir is structured. Someone once wrote that a writer doesn’t choose his obsessions. The most we can demand of him is that he write about them well. That is what Barnes has done in this book. ( )
  HenrySt123 | Jul 19, 2021 |
> "RIEN À CRAINDRE" par Julian Barnes. — Comment parler de la mort , sans pour autant perdre le sens de l'humour ? Doit-on la redouter, s'en moquer, lui tourner le dos, l'inviter prudemment à sa table pour négocier avec elle ?
Dans cet essai atypique et vagabond, le très flegmatique Barnes nous offre un savoureux cocktail de souvenirs intimes, une conversation à bâtons rompus où il fait semblant de badiner avant d'affronter la question qui l'obsède : celle de la mort. Comment faut-il en parler, sans pour autant perdre le sens de l'humour ? Doit-on la redouter, s'en moquer, lui tourner le dos, l'inviter prudemment à sa table pour négocier avec elle ? Et Dieu, dans tout ça, à quoi sert-il ? Autant d'interrogations à la fois graves et narquoises, sous la plume d'un "philosophe amateur" qui signe une sorte de traité de sagesse provisoire, avec l'ironie de son maître Jules Renard. --L'Express

> Babelio : https://www.babelio.com/livres/Barnes-Rien-a-craindre/187840
  Joop-le-philosophe | Feb 10, 2021 |
Yawn.

I need a new shelf. Started but discarded.

This is the first Barnes I've read (and that is more or less all of them) and haven't liked. It may not be autobiographical, but it is horribly close and he just isn't interesting. He isn't, his brother isn't. Nor are his parents or grandparents. Even worse, it is wordily pompous, which I gather is why the French like him so much.

Death itself may be an interesting subject (or may not) but what isn't interesting is other people's obsessions, including Barnes' with death. It's sort of like having to sit through other people talking about their dreams when you know even your own would have been best missed, if only you had a choice in the matter.

Well, this time, I did.
( )
  bringbackbooks | Jun 16, 2020 |
Yawn.

I need a new shelf. Started but discarded.

This is the first Barnes I've read (and that is more or less all of them) and haven't liked. It may not be autobiographical, but it is horribly close and he just isn't interesting. He isn't, his brother isn't. Nor are his parents or grandparents. Even worse, it is wordily pompous, which I gather is why the French like him so much.

Death itself may be an interesting subject (or may not) but what isn't interesting is other people's obsessions, including Barnes' with death. It's sort of like having to sit through other people talking about their dreams when you know even your own would have been best missed, if only you had a choice in the matter.

Well, this time, I did.
( )
  bringbackbooks | Jun 16, 2020 |
Yawn.

I need a new shelf. Started but discarded.

This is the first Barnes I've read (and that is more or less all of them) and haven't liked. It may not be autobiographical, but it is horribly close and he just isn't interesting. He isn't, his brother isn't. Nor are his parents or grandparents. Even worse, it is wordily pompous, which I gather is why the French like him so much.

Death itself may be an interesting subject (or may not) but what isn't interesting is other people's obsessions, including Barnes' with death. It's sort of like having to sit through other people talking about their dreams when you know even your own would have been best missed, if only you had a choice in the matter.

Well, this time, I did.
( )
  bringbackbooks | Jun 16, 2020 |
Es mostren 1-5 de 40 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Has d'iniciar sessió per poder modificar les dades del coneixement compartit.
Si et cal més ajuda, mira la pàgina d'ajuda del coneixement compartit.
Títol normalitzat
Títol original
Títols alternatius
Data original de publicació
Gent/Personatges
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Llocs importants
Esdeveniments importants
Pel·lícules relacionades
Premis i honors
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Epígraf
Dedicatòria
Per a P.
Primeres paraules
No crec en Déu, però el trobo a faltar.
Citacions
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
This is not, by the way, "my autobiography." Nor am I "in search of my parents." . . . Part of what I'm doing -- which may seem unnecessary -- is trying to work out how dead they are. My father died in 1992, my mother in 1997. (pp. 35-6)

Perhaps I should warn you (especially if you are a philosopher, theologian, or biologist) that some of this book will strike you as amateur, do-it-yourself stuff. But then we are all amateurs in and of our own lives. . . . I should also warn you that there are going to be a lot of writers in this book. Most of them are dead, and quite a few of them French. (p. 39)
...perhaps a sense of death is like a sense of humour. We all think the one we've got - or haven't got - is just about right, and appropriate to the proper understanding of life. It's everyone else who's out of step.
Darreres paraules
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Nota de desambiguació
Editor de l'editorial
Creadors de notes promocionals a la coberta
Llengua original
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
CDD/SMD canònics
LCC canònic

Referències a aquesta obra en fonts externes.

Wikipedia en anglès

No n'hi ha cap

Julian Barnes new book is, among many things, a family memoir, an exchange with his brother (a philosopher), a meditation on mortality and the fear of death, a celebration of art, an argument with and about God, and a homage to the French writer Jules Renard.

No s'han trobat descripcions de biblioteca.

Descripció del llibre
Sumari haiku

Cobertes populars

Dreceres

Gèneres

Melvil Decimal System (DDC)

823.914 — Literature English English fiction Modern Period 20th Century 1945-1999

LCC (Classificació de la Biblioteca del Congrés dels EUA)

Valoració

Mitjana: (3.78)
0.5
1 6
1.5
2 16
2.5 6
3 37
3.5 14
4 64
4.5 20
5 47

Ets tu?

Fes-te Autor del LibraryThing.

 

Quant a | Contacte | LibraryThing.com | Privadesa/Condicions | Ajuda/PMF | Blog | Botiga | APIs | TinyCat | Biblioteques llegades | Crítics Matiners | Coneixement comú | 162,510,330 llibres! | Barra superior: Sempre visible