IniciGrupsConversesMésTendències
Cerca al lloc
Aquest lloc utilitza galetes per a oferir els nostres serveis, millorar el desenvolupament, per a anàlisis i (si no has iniciat la sessió) per a publicitat. Utilitzant LibraryThing acceptes que has llegit i entès els nostres Termes de servei i política de privacitat. L'ús que facis del lloc i dels seus serveis està subjecte a aquestes polítiques i termes.
Hide this

Resultats de Google Books

Clica una miniatura per anar a Google Books.

S'està carregant…

Thursbitch (2003)

de Alan Garner

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaMencions
3361258,105 (3.48)43
An exploration, through fiction, of a C18 mystery that lives on in the valley of Thursbitch. John Turner, a packman, died in a storm in 1755, and was found with a woman's footprint in the snow beside him. His death leaves an emotional charge that Ian and Sal find affects their own relationship.
S'està carregant…

Apunta't a LibraryThing per saber si aquest llibre et pot agradar.

No hi ha cap discussió a Converses sobre aquesta obra.

» Mira també 43 mencions

Es mostren 1-5 de 13 (següent | mostra-les totes)
I discovered the English author Alan Garner (b-1934) when my parents gave me his first novel, The Weirdstone of Brisingamen, (1960) one Christmas. I loved its English folklore and was enchanted by the fantasy. Still, it came as a surprise to me when at teachers' college studying children's literature, I was introduced to Red Shift (1973). That book didn't strike me as one I might read to primary school children, and when I hunted them out, nor did Brisingamen's sequel, The Moon of Gomrath(1963), or Elidor(1965), or The Owl Service (1967). I liked them, but they were difficult books conceptually, and when I decoded the last lines of Red Shift (using the Lewis Carroll Alphabet Cipher) I would have hesitated to use the book even in a secondary school because I thought it was far too pessimistic for melancholy adolescents, even if their chances of decoding its devastating final words were slim.

Well, Thursbitch (2003) is difficult and pessimistic too. It's one of 1001 Books You Must Read Before You Die (2006 edition). It shares elements with Red Shift because it plays with time, the long ago past bleeding into the present and influencing the action of the characters in both eras. Although it's only 160 pages long, it took a long time to read because I had to keep re-reading parts of it to make any sense of it. It didn't help that due to its slim size, I chose it as a 'handbag' book

The landscape is ancient. Thursbitch is actually a valley, (also spelt Thursbatch) near Macclesfield in the Pennines on the borders of Cheshire and Derbyshire. When the story begins, in our present time, a mismatched couple are climbing in difficult terrain and getting lost, but as the story progresses, it becomes clear that Sal is suffering from some kind of neuro-degenerative disease (maybe Motor-Neurone Disease or Multiple Sclerosis) and Ian is her long-suffering carer. Sal is making a last-ditch effort to research standing stones, wayside markers from the past and is very knowledgeable about the geology of the landscape, though her recall of words is failing as her disease progresses. Ian is the butt of her scorn.

To read the rest of my review please visit https://anzlitlovers.com/2019/04/17/thursbitch-by-alan-garner/ ( )
  anzlitlovers | Apr 17, 2019 |
When I was young, Alan Garner was one of my favorite authors. His books for children capture, possibly more than any others, the beauty and magic of British folklore. Naturally, I was excited when I found out, just recently, that he's also written some material for adults (and, received an OBE for his contributions to English literature - a well-deserved honor.)

'Thursbitch' is the first 'adult' work by Garner that I was able to acquire (thanks to ILL!)

More of a study than a novel, 'Thursbitch' explores two sets of events in the titular Pennine valley. In the 18th century, we meet John Turner, a traveling trader and practitioner of traditional folk magic. In the modern day, we meet Sal and Ian, walking the same hills and rocks. Their lives touch, at moments, through time, exploring love, loss, and the connections between people...

I doubt whether I have ever encountered a more accurate or well-researched depiction of the speech and behavior of (extremely) rural, isolated 18th-century Britons. Garner is a linguist, and this book concentrates heavily on language. It's fascinating, but also makes for a rather challenging read.

In the present, Sal is an accomplished geologist - who is also suffering from a debilitating brain disease. So she also speaks in an argot, which makes an interesting contrast.

(I did wonder whether it would be as challenging for speakers of UK English, and whether this factored into why it hasn't been published in the USA.)

As a work of literature, 'Thursbitch' is impressive and interesting. However, emotionally, I didn't love it as much as I've loved Garner's other works. ( )
  AltheaAnn | Feb 9, 2016 |
Despite being a member of the English People who actually say "nowt" and "owt" a thousand times a day, this was extremely jarring and often unnecessary. It was confusing and, from the blurb and other reviews, seems to only get more confusing, but there is still a part of me that wants to read the rest. I may return, if only because it is a short story and won't take up too much of my time. The name is very misleading as it sounds more like a fantasy than the historical-contemporary mix it actually is. ( )
  Xleptodactylous | Apr 7, 2015 |
I generally love Alan Garner's books and in particular his sense of place and the way he takes me to familiar places. I did like to see those familiar places between Macclesfield and Buxton recited in a novel but it wasn't enough to keep me reading and I found the flitting between the 18th century and the present confusing and I was failing to engage with any of the characters and even the landscape.
Just at the moment I don't have the energy to continue with novels that are not keeping my attention and so stopped reading. ( )
  CarolKub | Nov 3, 2014 |
His kids bookseffortlessly convery a senseof place, and the ancient gods rooted in them. This one for adults seems to try a bit too hard. It starts of with great recitations of placenames interspersed with random gobbledegook in impenetrable dialect. Though the sense of place eventually does come through there's no real story or character to hold the whole thing together. ( )
  SChant | Apr 25, 2013 |
Es mostren 1-5 de 13 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Sense ressenyes | afegeix-hi una ressenya
Has d'iniciar sessió per poder modificar les dades del coneixement compartit.
Si et cal més ajuda, mira la pàgina d'ajuda del coneixement compartit.
Títol normalitzat
Títol original
Títols alternatius
Data original de publicació
Gent/Personatges
Llocs importants
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Esdeveniments importants
Pel·lícules relacionades
Premis i honors
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Epígraf
Dedicatòria
Primeres paraules
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
He climbed from Sooker and the snow was drifting.
Citacions
Darreres paraules
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Nota de desambiguació
Editor de l'editorial
Creadors de notes promocionals a la coberta
Llengua original
CDD/SMD canònics

Referències a aquesta obra en fonts externes.

Wikipedia en anglès (1)

An exploration, through fiction, of a C18 mystery that lives on in the valley of Thursbitch. John Turner, a packman, died in a storm in 1755, and was found with a woman's footprint in the snow beside him. His death leaves an emotional charge that Ian and Sal find affects their own relationship.

No s'han trobat descripcions de biblioteca.

Descripció del llibre
Sumari haiku

Dreceres

Cobertes populars

Valoració

Mitjana: (3.48)
0.5 1
1 3
1.5 1
2 7
2.5 3
3 14
3.5 4
4 16
4.5 4
5 13

Ets tu?

Fes-te Autor del LibraryThing.

 

Quant a | Contacte | LibraryThing.com | Privadesa/Condicions | Ajuda/PMF | Blog | Botiga | APIs | TinyCat | Biblioteques llegades | Crítics Matiners | Coneixement comú | 157,897,671 llibres! | Barra superior: Sempre visible