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Enric IV : primera part

de William Shakespeare

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Sèrie: Henry IV (1)

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4,993392,161 (3.86)111
"I feel that I have spent half my career with one or another Pelican Shakespeare in my back pocket. Convenience, however, is the least important aspect of the new Pelican Shakespeare series. Here is an elegant and clear text for either the study or the rehearsal room, notes where you need them and the distinguished scholarship of the general editors, Stephen Orgel and A. R. Braunmuller who understand that these are plays for performance as well as great texts for contemplation." (Patrick Stewart) The distinguished Pelican Shakespeare series, which has sold more than four million copies, is now completely revised and repackaged. Each volume features: * Authoritative, reliable texts * High quality introductions and notes * New, more readable trade trim size * An essay on the theatrical world of Shakespeare and essays on Shakespeare's life and the selection of texts… (més)
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Anglès (38)  Suec (1)  Totes les llengües (39)
Es mostren 1-5 de 39 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Personally, would have liked more Hotspur and less Falstaff, though I realize that more intelligent readers disagree. Falstaff was especially annoying in the Shrewsbury scenes. ( )
  gtross | May 26, 2023 |
In performance I have found 1 Henry IV to be a bit tedious so a part of me wanted to dislike the experience of reading it order thay my earlier opinion might be validated.

Alas, I found the experience of reading the play to be thoroughly entertaining. The characters are rich, the wordplay wonderful, and the plot arc also quite satisfying. Now I see why this play is often held among Shakespeare's best. ( )
  ubiquitousuk | Jun 30, 2022 |
Another play for my Shakespeare class. Not a favorite; I don't think the themes of honor etc. are expounded on very well in this one. ( )
  et.carole | Jan 21, 2022 |
Been a few years since I've read through Henry IV, and glad to say I enjoy it just as much as always. When taken together with Part 2, really does give you anything you desire of "tragedy, comedy, history, pastoral, pastoral-comical, historical-pastoral, tragical-historical, tragical-comical-historical-pastoral". As they say. ( )
  misslevel | Sep 22, 2021 |
This review is written with a GPL 4.0 license and the rights contained therein shall supersede all TOS by any and all websites in regards to copying and sharing without proper authorization and permissions. Crossposted at WordPress, Blogspot & Librarything by Bookstooge’s Exalted Permission

Title: Henry IV, Part I
Author: William Shakespeare
Rating: 4 of 5 Stars
Genre: Play
Pages: 89
Words: 25K

Synopsis:


From Wikipedia

Henry Bolingbroke—now King Henry IV—is having an unquiet reign. His personal disquiet at the usurpation of his predecessor Richard II would be solved by a crusade to the Holy Land, but trouble on his borders with Scotland and Wales make leaving unwise. Moreover, he is increasingly at odds with the Percy family, who helped him to his throne, and Edmund Mortimer, the Earl of March, Richard II's chosen heir.

Adding to King Henry's troubles is the behaviour of his son and heir, the Prince of Wales. Hal (the future Henry V) has forsaken the Royal Court to waste his time in taverns with low companions. This makes him an object of scorn to the nobles and calls into question his royal worthiness. Hal's chief friend and foil in living the low life is Sir John Falstaff. Fat, old, drunk, and corrupt as he is, he has a charisma and a zest for life that captivates the Prince.

The play features three groups of characters that interact slightly at first, and then come together in the Battle of Shrewsbury, where the success of the rebellion will be decided. First there is King Henry himself and his immediate council. He is the engine of the play, but usually in the background. Next there is the group of rebels, energetically embodied in Henry Percy ("Hotspur") and including his father, the Earl of Northumberland and led by his uncle Thomas Percy, Earl of Worcester. The Scottish Earl of Douglas, Edmund Mortimer and the Welshman Owen Glendower also join. Finally, at the centre of the play are the young Prince Hal and his companions Falstaff, Poins, Bardolph, and Peto. Streetwise and pound-foolish, these rogues manage to paint over this grim history in the colours of comedy.

As the play opens, the king is angry with Hotspur for refusing him most of the prisoners taken in a recent action against the Scots at Holmedon. Hotspur, for his part, would have the king ransom Edmund Mortimer (his wife's brother) from Owen Glendower, the Welshman who holds him. Henry refuses, berates Mortimer's loyalty, and treats the Percys with threats and rudeness. Stung and alarmed by Henry's dangerous and peremptory way with them, they proceed to make common cause with the Welsh and Scots, intending to depose "this ingrate and cankered Bolingbroke."[3] By Act II, rebellion is brewing.

Meanwhile, Henry's son Hal is joking, drinking, and thieving with Falstaff and his associates. He likes Falstaff but makes no pretense at being like him. He enjoys insulting his dissolute friend and makes sport of him by joining in Poins' plot to disguise themselves and rob and terrify Falstaff and three friends of loot they have stolen in a highway robbery, purely for the fun of hearing Falstaff lie about it later, after which Hal returns the stolen money. Rather early in the play, in fact, Hal informs us that his riotous time will soon come to a close, and he will re-assume his rightful high place in affairs by showing himself worthy to his father and others through some (unspecified) noble exploits. Hal believes that this sudden change of manner will amount to a greater reward and acknowledgment of prince-ship, and in turn earn him respect from the members of the court.

The revolt of Mortimer and the Percys very quickly gives him his chance to do just that. The high and the low come together when the Prince makes up with his father and is given a high command. He vows to fight and kill the rebel Hotspur, and orders Falstaff (who is, after all, a knight) to take charge of a group of foot soldiers and proceed to the battle site at Shrewsbury.

The battle is crucial because if the rebels even achieve a standoff their cause gains greatly, as they have other powers awaiting under Northumberland, Glendower, Mortimer, and the Archbishop of York. Henry needs a decisive victory here. He outnumbers the rebels,[4] but Hotspur, with the wild hope of despair, leads his troops into battle. The day wears on, the issue still in doubt, the king harried by the wild Scot Douglas, when Prince Hal and Hotspur, the two Harrys that cannot share one land, meet. Finally they will fight – for glory, for their lives, and for the kingdom. No longer a tavern brawler but a warrior, the future king prevails, ultimately killing Hotspur in single combat.

On the way to this climax, we are treated to Falstaff, who has "misused the King's press damnably",[5] not only by taking money from able-bodied men who wished to evade service but by keeping the wages of the poor souls he brought instead who were killed in battle ("food for powder, food for powder").[6] Left on his own during Hal's battle with Hotspur, Falstaff dishonourably counterfeits death to avoid attack by Douglas. After Hal leaves Hotspur's body on the field, Falstaff revives in a mock miracle. Seeing he is alone, he stabs Hotspur's corpse in the thigh and claims credit for the kill.[7] Though Hal knows better, he allows Falstaff his disreputable tricks. Soon after being given grace by Hal, Falstaff states that he wants to amend his life and begin "to live cleanly as a nobleman should do".[8]

The play ends at Shrewsbury, after the battle. The death of Hotspur has taken the heart out of the rebels,[9] and the king's forces prevail. Henry is pleased with the outcome, not least because it gives him a chance to execute Thomas Percy, the Earl of Worcester, one of his chief enemies (though previously one of his greatest friends). Meanwhile, Hal shows off his kingly mercy in praise of valour; having taken the valiant Douglas prisoner, Hal orders his enemy released without ransom.[10] But the war goes on; now the king's forces must deal with the Archbishop of York, who has joined with Northumberland, and with the forces of Mortimer and Glendower. This unsettled ending sets the stage for Henry IV, Part 2.

My Thoughts:

This really should have been entitled “Henry V, the Early Years”. While Henry IV is the titular character, he seems to do little besides provide a reason for more kingdom drama. Everyone is going off to war at a moments notice on what seems pretty much like a whim. During all of this, young Prince Harry (by the by, WHY does the name Henry spawn the nickname Harry? It's not even shorter for goodness sake) is carousing it up and being a blot upon his father's name. He is unfavorably compared to the other Harry, the one leading the rebellion against the King.

In the final battle Harry shows his royal colors and mans it up perfectly. He seems to have set his rascally youthful ways behind him and to take his responsibilities seriously. Of course, all his old low friends are sure they are going to be sitting pretty once Harry becomes King, so they do what they want. Oh ye evil men, Judgement is coming!

Once again, I am loving these history plays. I was actually looking forward to reading this when Shakespeare rolled around in my reading rotation. What a change from earlier plays where that word “Shakespeare” brought dread and dismal despair to my heart. In fact, I seriously thought about just reading Part II of Henry IV but thankfully calmer and wiser heads prevailed (ie, my rational self instead of my emotional self).

★★★★☆ ( )
  BookstoogeLT | Mar 1, 2021 |
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Nom de l'autorCàrrecTipus d'autorObra?Estat
Shakespeare, WilliamAutorautor primaritotes les edicionsconfirmat
Barnet, SylvanEditorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Bate, JonathanEditorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Bevington, DavidEditorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Braunmuller, Albert RichardEditorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Brooke, TuckerEditorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Brooks, Harold F.Editorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Chandler, Frank WadleighEditorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Cowl, R. P.Editorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Davison, Peter HobleyEditorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Edelman, CharlesEditorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Farjeon, HerbertEditorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Gentleman, DavidDissenyador de la cobertaautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Gill, RomaEditorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Harbage, AlfredEditorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Harrison, George B.Editorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Hemingway, Samuel BurdettEditorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Hodges, C. WalterDissenyador de la cobertaautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Hudson, Henry N.Editorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Humphreys, A REditorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Hunter, G. K.Editorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Jenkins, HaroldEditorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Kent, RockwellIl·lustradorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Kittredge, George LymanEditorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Lamar, Virginia A.Editorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Mack, MaynardEditorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Moorman, Frederic W.Editorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Morgan, A. E.Editorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Mowat, Barbara A.Editorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Orgel, StephenEditorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Raffel, BurtonEditorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Rasmussen, EricEditorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Rolfe, W. J.Editorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Sanderson, James LEditorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Shaaber, Matthias AdamEditorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Stevenson, O. J.Editorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Wilson, John DoverEditorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Wright, Louis B.Editorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat

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Towards the end of The First Part of King Henry IV, Prince Hal stands over two bodies.

Introduction, New Penguin Shakespeare.
So shaken as we are, so wan with care,

Find we a time for frighted peace to pant,

And breathe short-winded accents of new broils

To be commenc'd in stronds afar remote.
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If all the year were playing holidays,

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He hath eaten me out of house and home.
The better part of valor is discretion, in the which better part I have saved my life.
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This work is for the complete Henry IV, Part I only. Do not combine this work with abridgements, adaptations or "simplifications" (such as "Shakespeare Made Easy"), Cliffs Notes or similar study guides, or anything else that does not contain the full text. Do not include any video recordings. Additionally, do not combine this with other plays.
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"I feel that I have spent half my career with one or another Pelican Shakespeare in my back pocket. Convenience, however, is the least important aspect of the new Pelican Shakespeare series. Here is an elegant and clear text for either the study or the rehearsal room, notes where you need them and the distinguished scholarship of the general editors, Stephen Orgel and A. R. Braunmuller who understand that these are plays for performance as well as great texts for contemplation." (Patrick Stewart) The distinguished Pelican Shakespeare series, which has sold more than four million copies, is now completely revised and repackaged. Each volume features: * Authoritative, reliable texts * High quality introductions and notes * New, more readable trade trim size * An essay on the theatrical world of Shakespeare and essays on Shakespeare's life and the selection of texts

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