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The Compassionate Carnivore: Or, How to Keep…
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The Compassionate Carnivore: Or, How to Keep Animals Happy, Save Old… (edició 2008)

de Catherine Friend

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For most of her life, Catherine Friend was a carnivore who preferred not to consider where the meat on her plate came from--beef didn't have a face, chicken didn't have a personality, and pork certainly shouldn't have feelings. But Friend's attitude began to change after she and her partner bought a farm and began raising sheep for meat. Friend's ensuing odyssey through the world of livestock and farming is a journey that offers critical insights--for omnivores and herbivores alike--into how our meat is raised, how we buy it and from whom, and why change is desirable and possible. From a distressing lesson about her favorite Minnesota State Fair food (pork-chop-on-a-stick) to the surprising gratitude that came from eating an animal she'd raised and loved, Friend takes us on a wild and woolly ride through her small farm (with several brief detours into life on factory farms), along the way raising questions such as: What are the differences between factory, conventional, sustainable, and organic farms, and more importantly, why do we need to understand those differences? What do all those labels--from organic to local to grass fed and pasture raised--really mean? If you're buying from a small farmer, what are the key questions to ask? How do you find that small farmer, and what's the best way to help her help you? In the same witty and warm style that characterized her memoir Hit by a Farm, Friend uses her perspective as a sustainable farmer and carnivore to consider meat animals' quality of life--while still supporting the choice to eat meat. Regardless of whether you eat meat once a day, once a week, or once a year, your perspective of what goes on your plate--and in your mouth--will never be the same.… (més)
Membre:moderndaygypsy
Títol:The Compassionate Carnivore: Or, How to Keep Animals Happy, Save Old MacDonald's Farm, Reduce Your Hoofprint, and Still
Autors:Catherine Friend
Informació:Da Capo Press (2008), Edition: 1st Da Capo Press Ed, Hardcover, 291 pages
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca, Llegint actualment
Valoració:
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The Compassionate Carnivore: Or, How to Keep Animals Happy, Save Old MacDonald's Farm, Reduce Your Hoofprint, and Still Eat Meat de Catherine Friend

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Part of the reason I disliked this book may be that it was just not the book for me at this time as a reader. Part of it may be that much of the arguments Friend makes are things I have seen in other books such as Fast Food Nation and Supersize Me. I will admit that I skimmed parts of the book due to the repetition. It is not that I disagree with the arguments; it's just that I have seen a lot of the stuff before, so I did not really need to see it again. The memoir parts, to be honest, had a little bit on the "Pollyanna" tone. I think she makes a valid point: that you can be a carnivore and be compassionate about the meat you eat; more importantly, be very aware of where your food comes from and try to choose more compassionate and healthy alternatives. But a lot of the message is repetitive throughout the book (yea, I got it the first time). The recommendations at the end, while noble, are fairly unrealistic to the average person. I mean, how many folks do you know can afford to buy a whole hog or steer, let alone have a place to store all the butchered meat? I think the idea of buying your meat directly from a sustainable farmer is a good one, but as I said, not necessarily realistic, which, noble as it is, is where things fall apart for this book. And while Friend says people should just not choose to not do anything, there are no realistic alternatives, or they would take way too much work. I know I would not be able to buy even a quarter of a steer (an option in some places), let alone have the place to store all the meat. As much as I dislike factory produced meat, personally at least, I do not have too many options to go the more natural route the author suggests. The whole thing is a bit too much on the idealistic side, which is a pity because there are some good points in the book. Overall, not a book I would recommend. ( )
  bloodravenlib | Aug 17, 2020 |
After reading “The Omnivore's Dilemma,” and watching "Food Matters," this book was a refreshing dose of moderation and presented a balanced approach to positively changing our meat eating society. I would not call this book "anti-vegetarian" as some reviewers have. Friend shares her views and points, and presents readers with "real world" ideas and "normal people" mechanisms to move the industry in the direction that she presents as important. Friend is well educated on all sides of the issues she presents, not only with facts and figures, but with a deep understanding and experience. Friend shares her own struggles and successes and passions, and moves readers to find their own zeal for change while offering options, ideas, and sources to do so. She suggests starting with a personal goal list. I’ve started moving toward my goals, and hope you will too! Highly recommended book! Check out Friend's farm blog at http://www.hitbyafarm.com/farm-tales.html. ( )
  yogiclarebear | Aug 31, 2010 |
While I didn't learn anything new from this book, it helped to remind me why I choose my food carefully. Catherine Friend describes in horrific detail the treatment of animals in "food factories", in the context of her own journey towards eating more conscientiously. She is too eager, especially after the appalling statistics she quotes, to reassure readers that they shouldn't feel too bad if they don't always make the best food choices, but I can understand that she wants to present an accessible goal.
  kdcdavis | Mar 28, 2010 |
A good mid-point book for folks who want to make changes to their diet, but aren't willing to become vegetarians. I'm not morally opposed to eating meat - but I do think that animals should live in decent conditions before their slaughter. The author calls this happy meat. ( )
  etznab | Jan 18, 2009 |
I love Catherine Friend's homey, familiar writing style, especially in an information-packed subject area such as sustainable farming and eating—it sings. ( )
  hapakine | Jun 16, 2008 |
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For most of her life, Catherine Friend was a carnivore who preferred not to consider where the meat on her plate came from--beef didn't have a face, chicken didn't have a personality, and pork certainly shouldn't have feelings. But Friend's attitude began to change after she and her partner bought a farm and began raising sheep for meat. Friend's ensuing odyssey through the world of livestock and farming is a journey that offers critical insights--for omnivores and herbivores alike--into how our meat is raised, how we buy it and from whom, and why change is desirable and possible. From a distressing lesson about her favorite Minnesota State Fair food (pork-chop-on-a-stick) to the surprising gratitude that came from eating an animal she'd raised and loved, Friend takes us on a wild and woolly ride through her small farm (with several brief detours into life on factory farms), along the way raising questions such as: What are the differences between factory, conventional, sustainable, and organic farms, and more importantly, why do we need to understand those differences? What do all those labels--from organic to local to grass fed and pasture raised--really mean? If you're buying from a small farmer, what are the key questions to ask? How do you find that small farmer, and what's the best way to help her help you? In the same witty and warm style that characterized her memoir Hit by a Farm, Friend uses her perspective as a sustainable farmer and carnivore to consider meat animals' quality of life--while still supporting the choice to eat meat. Regardless of whether you eat meat once a day, once a week, or once a year, your perspective of what goes on your plate--and in your mouth--will never be the same.

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