IniciGrupsConversesMésTendències
Cerca al lloc
Aquest lloc utilitza galetes per a oferir els nostres serveis, millorar el desenvolupament, per a anàlisis i (si no has iniciat la sessió) per a publicitat. Utilitzant LibraryThing acceptes que has llegit i entès els nostres Termes de servei i política de privacitat. L'ús que facis del lloc i dels seus serveis està subjecte a aquestes polítiques i termes.
Hide this

Resultats de Google Books

Clica una miniatura per anar a Google Books.

The Waste Land, Prufrock and Other Poems…
S'està carregant…

The Waste Land, Prufrock and Other Poems (Dover Thrift Editions) (edició 1998)

de T. S. Eliot (Autor)

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaMencions
1,0011415,488 (4.15)14
In the masterly cadences of T. S. Eliot's verse, the 20th century found its definitive poetic voice, an incredible "image of its accelerated grimace," in the words of Eliot's friend and mentor, Erza Pound. This volume is a rich collection of much of Eliot's greatest work. The title poem, The Waste Land (1922), ranks among the most influential poetic works of the century. An exploration of the psychic stages of a despairing soul caught in a struggle for redemption, the poem contrasts the spiritual stagnation of the modern world with the ennobling myths of the past. Other selections include the complete contents of Prufrock (1971), including "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock," "Portrait of a Lady," "Rhapsody on a Windy Night," "Mr. Apollinax," and "Morning at the Window." From Poems (1920) there are "Gerontion," "The Hippopotamus," "Mr. Eliot's Sunday Morning Service," "Sweeney Among the Nightingales," and more. An indispensable resource for all poetry lovers, this modestly priced edition is also an ideal text for English literature courses from high school to college. Includes "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock" from the Common Core.… (més)
Membre:megdeg
Títol:The Waste Land, Prufrock and Other Poems (Dover Thrift Editions)
Autors:T. S. Eliot (Autor)
Informació:Dover Publications (1998), Edition: English Language, 64 pages
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca
Valoració:
Etiquetes:No n'hi ha cap

Detalls de l'obra

The Waste Land, Prufrock and Other Poems (Dover Thrift Editions) de T. S. Eliot

S'està carregant…

Apunta't a LibraryThing per saber si aquest llibre et pot agradar.

No hi ha cap discussió a Converses sobre aquesta obra.

» Mira també 14 mencions

Es mostren 1-5 de 14 (següent | mostra-les totes)
So embarrassed to be giving TS Eliot 3 stars, but now that I've read it, I probably won't do a re-read. I liked Prufrock more than The Wasteland. I could spend days reading the commentaries and then the literary allusions from the poems. I felt Prufrock was delightful and read it several times. I felt I read The Wasteland multiple times (with commentary) because it was imperative to a decent poetic education. It seemed like a lot of World War I angst and soldiers returning with PTSD - a sad poem, really. I read this small book which I've owned for years because my sister decided to read his poems so we might have a discussion about it. ( )
  Chica3000 | Dec 11, 2020 |
After reading Evelyn Waugh's A Handful of Dust, the title of which is derived from T.S. Eliot's modernist poem, The Waste Land, I was compelled to read the poem and to learn more about Eliot. Up until today, my knowledge of Eliot was limited to what I had gleaned from Woody Allen's Midnight in Paris.

I have read all around Eliot, including Djuna Barnes (whom Eliot admired)1, Ernest Hemingway, Scott Fitzgerald, Gertrude Stein, Sherwood Andersen, Ford Madox Ford, and Virginia Woolf. But I have shied away from poetry until only recently.

After reading the poem, I listened to the BBC's In Our Time podcast episode, "The Waste Land and Modernity". There was much interesting discussion about the original book version of Eliot's poem. Apparently, the poem itself was too short to be a book and the publisher asked Eliot to pad it out.

Eliot added a bunch of notes to the poem, many of which turned out to be superfluous. The poem had also been cut down considerably by Ezra Pound, which took away the various signals of the several stories that emerge in the poem.

I listened to a reading of the poem on YouTube, partly read by Eliot. In the In Our Time discussion, they mentioned that the poem was published at the same time BBC Radio began, so in many ways the poem lends itself to a radio reading. It is interesting how listening to the poem being read makes the different voices more obvious, whereas this is somewhat obscured in a first reading (to oneself).

In sum, an issue that constantly strikes me is that the more I read, the less I know. And in many ways, based on my reading around The Waste Land, and from the discussions on the In Our Time podcast, Eliot meant to show how we don't or can't know everything; indeed, we may not need to know everything.

Even the different interpretations by American versus English critics revealed different interpretations of common English sayings highlighted in the poem. And of course, there are many references to the classics and so on which I hope to discover by obtaining a copy of the original (pre-Pound) version of the poem, and also the published version with the superfluous notes added by Eliot.

The poem apparently took Eliot one year to write, and he was quite upset by the paltry sum first offered to him for its publication. Yet it is now regarded as the most influential poems of the twentieth century.

Like all great works, the poem deserves several readings. But if you want to really hear the different voices, the recital of the poem will bring this to the fore. ( )
  madepercy | Dec 26, 2018 |
(Original review, 1981-05-10)

It seems to me that the author of 'Prufrock' and that of the Wasteland are so different as to be un-recognisable. A look at the Wasteland reveals a lot of, to me, gratuitous classical referencing for which we might like to blame Pound and while I value its novelty (whereas Prufrock reads like Kublai Khan) the Wasteland reads like deliberate pastiche.

Eliot learned the need to inject stock ingredients into a poem if it is to fly with editors, perhaps explaining why Prufrock languished for so long. Don't tell me Hughes and Heaney weren't aware of a certain formulaic approach to poetry. I'm not saying it is a liability or necessarily a bad thing but I am saying that what is considered 'good' has more to do with vogue than what Eliot referred to as 'the really new'. Again, Auden's earliest published poetry fell into the trap of not pandering to 'the right style', so much so that the work is still un-excavated (properly) with a few notable exceptions. His more public style of the middle and late periods got their promised reward but it speaks to the public and not to his fellow poets as the early work did. At the height of Auden's fame, fewer than a thousand ciopies of his work were sold).

I recall reading how Joyce, upon first meeting Yeats (at a train station), wondered whether Yeats wasn't too old to understand what he (Joyce) was about. Eliot's first wife and Molly were peas in a pod it sounds to me, antidotes to the ossified world of Cultoor they had to cope with.

Eliot's time at Lloyd's, working by day as a Magritteish clerk while struggling with his real self is a far more attractive (and less educated) persona than the donnish Faber editor. Respectability doesn't seem to have done Eliot, his poetry at least, much good but of course it's all a matter of taste and perspective. Millions love their Eliot the way he be served up to them.

Rilke wins for me against the earlier Eliot, 'Duino Elegies' being far more sensitive, far less showy and show-offy (far less cringely 'erudite'), every bit as precise in its detailed anatomy of the new age then dawning and at least as startlingly wonderful in its imagery. There is, also, no vaudeville (he do the police in different voices but none of it terribly well) and it didn't need that madman Pound to strip it into shape. ( )
  antao | Dec 14, 2018 |
He was not a nice man, but his poetry is unmatched. So rhythmic, visceral, rolls in the mouth, incantatory. His words are pictures, unforgettable. Even Andrew Lloyd Webber can't touch him.
  deckla | May 31, 2018 |
Il "Canto d'Amore di J. Alfred Prufrock" è la poesia che segnò l'inizio della carriera poetica di T. S. Eliot, (1888–1965), il poeta inglese più importante del XX secolo e, a mio parere, uno dei migliori poeti di tutti i tempi. La poesia si presenta sotto la forma di monologo drammatico filtrato attraverso la tecnica narrativa del flusso della coscienza. Questa poesia l'ho conosciuta sulle pagine di un'antologia di poesie inglesi che avevo come testo di studio quando lavoravo in Inghilterra ai miei anni verdi. I favolosi anni sessanta, i così detti "roaring sixties". Anni “ruggenti” per gli altri, ma non di certo per me. Avevo, infatti, deciso di andarmene dall’Italia, lasciare il troppo stretto paesello del sud e andare in Inghilterraper imparare una lingua che non avevo mai studiato a scuola, che non conoscevo e che, eppure, mi attirava come nessun altra cosa al mondo. Il fascino delle cose impossibili che solamente chi è giovane sa decidere di inseguire. Una lingua ed una cultura che avrebbero poi caratterizzato la mia vita sia professionale che personale. Avrei, infatti, non solo insegnato quella lingua per circa 40 anni, mi avrebbe anche dato l’opportunità di incontrare l’altra metà del cielo o della mela, mia moglie, anche lei con la stessa passione linguistica.

Studiavo e lavoravo contemporaneamente per mantenermi in terra di Albione. A quei tempi, soltanto se avevi un permesso di lavoro fisso, potevi restare in Inghilterra. Ed io lavoravo in un ospedale mentale, e studiavo la lingua e la letteratura del posto per corrispondenza, per conseguire i certificati di studio dell’Università di Cambridge. Frequentavo di sera, quando mi era possibile, le lezioni di un popolare “College of Further Education” di St. Albans, l’antica città romana di Verulam. Un vecchio tutor-professore ci leggeva dalle 19 alle 21 brani di prosa e poesia inglese. Ricordo che dedicò al Canto d’amore di Alfred Prufrock le due ore di una intera lezione. Una poesia difficile da capire allora, piena di allusioni, simboli e immagini da decifrare, scritta nella tecnica divenuta poi nota come “flusso della coscienza”. Avevo con me nel banco, Puck, una dolcissima olandesina, con la quale condividevo esperimenti poetici e non. Ridevamo delle lamentazioni di Alfred, della sua petulanza, di quelle lagne che ci sembravano ridicole, da vecchi e per vecchi. Allora avevamo poco più di venti anni, ed era giusto che la pensassimo a quel modo. Alfred l’ho poi re-incontrato sui banchi dell’università, e poi per anni l’ho presentato a migliaia di giovani. Il tema centrale della poesia è quello del passare del tempo, con tutte le innumerevoli sottocategorie possibili che questo termine comporta: amore, vecchiaia, ricordi, impotenza, illusioni, delusioni, allusioni, decadenza, sogni …

Se mi pareva, allora, difficile il testo inglese, ancora più impossibile mi sembravano i versi introduttivi di Dante. Non capimmo bene le spiegazioni che il tutor addusse per spiegarne la riproduzione da parte di Eliot. Sarebbe passato poi molto tempo e studio per capire che Eliot usa quei versi per gettare una luce ironica sulle intenzioni di Alfred a recuperare il tempo passato ed al suo vano tentativo di mettere insieme i cocci delle sue diverse personalità così come il tempo le aveva modellate. Guido sembra essere Prufrock, Dante sarebbe il lettore al quale il poeta rivolge i suoi versi. A quella età, ed a quel tempo, era per me e per Puck davvero difficile, se non impossibile, seguire il pensiero vagabondo di Alfred che oscilla tra l’illogico e lo psicologico. Atmosfera appesantita dal fatto che gli anni pesano sulle sue spalle e gli fanno dire cose che soltanto da vecchi si possono comprendere. E che ne sapevamo noi di tutto ciò? Dell’impotenza, delle incapacità, delle delusioni e delle finzioni usate nel corso degli anni? Quel continuo entrare ed uscire dal proprio io, essere o individualità, era davvero una cosa incomprensibile per noi che non avevamo il peso del tempo sulle nostre spalle.

Eppure, quella lingua usata, cantata e recitata in versi stupendi, era come una melodia infinita e non-descritta che aveva solo nel suono del mare e delle sirene in sottofondo, la giusta risonanza. “Misurare il tempo a cucchiaini” è una delle più belle espressioni poetiche che un poeta possa usare sullo scorrere del tempo. Così come lo vede un “vecchio” davanti alla sua tazza di tè o di caffè, seduto ad un tavolo sul lungomare. In attesa di sentire cantare sirene che non arriveranno mai, e che lui non potrà mai sentire. Ora che gli anni sul mio groppone sono molti, posso dire di comprendere ciò che intendevano dire Alfred e Eliot: “quando la sera è distesa contro il cielo, come un paziente anestetizzato sul tavolo operatorio”, “la segatura è stesa sul pavimento del ristorante”, “le sirene pettinano le bianche onde dei capelli, “quando il vento soffia sull’acqua e la fa diventare bianca e scura”, tutto questo è la precisa sensazione dell’usura e del decadimento dell’uomo e della vittoria del tempo sulla gioventù. L’arrivo inevitabile della vecchiaia. Ieri per Alfred e Eliot. Oggi per me e per Puck. Domani per te lettore. Sorge immediato il dubbio sul senso di tutto questo, del passato e del futuro. Ma Alfred Prufrock non conoscerà mai il senso del suo futuro. Anzi, il senso del tutto. Per me, per noi giovani lettori di allora, quei versi erano solo poesia, bellissima, insuperabile poesia. Oggi, col passare degli anni e con l’avvicinarsi della vittoria del tempo, so che Alfred aveva ragione. Quella ragione era il “suo” senso. Sarà così anche per me? Ancora non so dire.
-----
Parlare di poesia è sempre un fatto soggettivo. Non a caso sono le parole gli elementi decisivi che determinano i sentimenti, le sensazioni e le intuizioni che creano il messaggio poetico. Le parole, però, sono come il vento che trascina le foglie. Esse vanno e vengono, si posano e si riposano, sostano, compaiono e scompaiono, per poi ritornare senza dire dove sono state. Non cambiano mai, eppure sono sempre le stesse. Siamo in primavera e nuove foglie stanno per rinascere dalle gemme che brillano alla luce della vita dopo il letargo invernale. Ad ogni primavera si rinnova il miracolo sia delle foglie che delle parole. Come descrivere il mutamento, questo cambiamento che ritorna per definire l’indescrivibile, misteriosa mutevolezza dell’esistenza? Il mese di marzo scivola verso la fine. Sta per ritornare l’ora legale, un’ora più di luce e di vita. Eppure non riesco a credere che un poeta come T. S. Eliot abbia potuto dire che “Aprile è il più crudele dei mesi”.

April is the cruellest month, breeding
Lilacs out of the dead land, mixing
Memory and desire, stirring
Dull roots with spring rain…
---
Aprile è il più crudele di mesi: genera
Lillà dalla morta terra, mescola
Ricordo e desiderio, stimola
Le sopite radici con la pioggia primaverile…

(Trad. M. Praz)

In questo memorabile e ineguagliabile incipit del poema "La Terra Desolata" si realizza nella mente del poeta una magia, ma si prepara un incubo per il futuro del lettore: la rappresentazione della primavera. Il poeta la idealizza e la ferma nel tempo. Il lettore ne prevede la fine sulla sua pelle. Pensieri e parole di morte per questo, di vita per l’altro. Con i suoi versi Eliot ha toccato il cuore del mondo. Ha creato una realtà più forte della realtà stessa, ha incarnato il verbo, ha rivelato il potere straordinario di dare vita dentro una coscienza a un evento quotidiano come la pioggia improvvisa che fa rinnova e rigenera ma anche tradisce e marcisce.

Passano le stagioni ma ad ogni primavera quei versi sono ancora lì a richiamare innumerevoli ricordi che rendono la vita piena di mistero. Tutto fugge, tutto rimane nelle parole e nel ricordo ma nulla resta nel tempo. I mesi transitano nelle nostre esistenze e noi con loro. Facciamo esperienze che ci modificano, attraversiamo mondi a volte lontani e impossibili, ci trasformiamo. Eppure siamo sempre lì, rincuorati e sostenuti da parole che abbiamo scelto, che forse ci hanno scelto, come se ci fosse una linea di confine tra mutevolezza e ed eternità. Per chi scrive e per chi legge. La “Terra desolata” di Eliot non è l’unico esempio poetico con cui spiegare l’effetto della poesia. La lista è lunga e penso che ognuno ne abbia una sua con cui sentirsi veramente a casa in ogni luogo.

( )
  AntonioGallo | Nov 2, 2017 |
Es mostren 1-5 de 14 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Sense ressenyes | afegeix-hi una ressenya

Pertany a aquestes col·leccions editorials

Has d'iniciar sessió per poder modificar les dades del coneixement compartit.
Si et cal més ajuda, mira la pàgina d'ajuda del coneixement compartit.
Títol normalitzat
Títol original
Títols alternatius
Data original de publicació
Gent/Personatges
Llocs importants
Esdeveniments importants
Pel·lícules relacionades
Premis i honors
Epígraf
Dedicatòria
Primeres paraules
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Let us go then, you and I,
When the evening is spread out against the sky
Like a patient etherised upon a table;
Let us go, through certain half-deserted streets,
The muttering retreats
Of restlelss nights in one-night cheap hotels
And sawdust restaurants with oyster-shells:
Streets that follow like a tedious argument
Of insidious intent
To lead you to an overwhelming question. . . .
Oh, do not ask, "What is it?"
Let us go and make our visit.
Citacions
Darreres paraules
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Nota de desambiguació
Editor de l'editorial
Creadors de notes promocionals a la coberta
Llengua original
CDD/SMD canònics

Referències a aquesta obra en fonts externes.

Wikipedia en anglès

No n'hi ha cap

In the masterly cadences of T. S. Eliot's verse, the 20th century found its definitive poetic voice, an incredible "image of its accelerated grimace," in the words of Eliot's friend and mentor, Erza Pound. This volume is a rich collection of much of Eliot's greatest work. The title poem, The Waste Land (1922), ranks among the most influential poetic works of the century. An exploration of the psychic stages of a despairing soul caught in a struggle for redemption, the poem contrasts the spiritual stagnation of the modern world with the ennobling myths of the past. Other selections include the complete contents of Prufrock (1971), including "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock," "Portrait of a Lady," "Rhapsody on a Windy Night," "Mr. Apollinax," and "Morning at the Window." From Poems (1920) there are "Gerontion," "The Hippopotamus," "Mr. Eliot's Sunday Morning Service," "Sweeney Among the Nightingales," and more. An indispensable resource for all poetry lovers, this modestly priced edition is also an ideal text for English literature courses from high school to college. Includes "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock" from the Common Core.

No s'han trobat descripcions de biblioteca.

Descripció del llibre
Sumari haiku

Dreceres

Cobertes populars

Valoració

Mitjana: (4.15)
0.5
1 2
1.5
2 8
2.5 4
3 20
3.5 2
4 51
4.5 2
5 72

GenreThing

Ets tu?

Fes-te Autor del LibraryThing.

 

Quant a | Contacte | LibraryThing.com | Privadesa/Condicions | Ajuda/PMF | Blog | Botiga | APIs | TinyCat | Biblioteques llegades | Crítics Matiners | Coneixement comú | 160,267,616 llibres! | Barra superior: Sempre visible