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From Colony to Superpower: U.S. Foreign…
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From Colony to Superpower: U.S. Foreign Relations since 1776 (Oxford… (2008 original; edició 2011)

de George C. Herring (Autor)

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427643,377 (4.5)10
The Oxford History of the United States is the most respected multi-volume history of our nation in print. The series includes three Pulitzer Prize-winners, a New York Times bestseller, and winners of prestigious Bancroft and Parkman Prizes. From Colony to Superpower is the only thematic volume commissioned for the series. Here George C. Herring uses foreign relations as the lens through which to tell the story of America's dramatic rise from thirteen disparate colonies huddled along the Atlantic coast to the world's greatest superpower. A sweeping account of United States' foreign relations and diplomacy, this magisterial volume documents America's interaction with other peoples and nations of the world. Herring tells a story of stunning successes and sometimes tragic failures, captured in a fast-paced narrative that illuminates the central importance of foreign relations to the existence and survival of the nation, and highlights its ongoing impact on the lives of ordinary citizens. He shows how policymakers defined American interests broadly to include territorial expansion, access to growing markets, and the spread of an "American way" of life. And Herring does all this in a story rich in human drama and filled with epic events. Statesmen such as Benjamin Franklin and Woodrow Wilson and Harry Truman and Dean Acheson played key roles in America's rise to world power. But America's expansion as a nation also owes much to the adventurers and explorers, the sea captains, merchants and captains of industry, the missionaries and diplomats, who discovered or charted new lands, developed new avenues of commerce, and established and defended the nation's interests in foreign lands. From the American Revolution to the fifty-year struggle with communism and conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq, From Colony to Superpower tells the dramatic story of America's emergence as superpower--its birth in revolution, its troubled present, and its uncertain future.… (més)
Membre:euthyphro1
Títol:From Colony to Superpower: U.S. Foreign Relations since 1776 (Oxford History of the United States)
Autors:George C. Herring (Autor)
Informació:Oxford University Press (2011), Edition: 1, 1056 pages
Col·leccions:Quizbowl Studying List
Valoració:
Etiquetes:American History

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From Colony to Superpower: U.S. Foreign Relations Since 1776 de George C. Herring (2008)

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Americans have long preferred to ignore events beyond the borders of their country. Yet to adopt such an attitude, as George Herring contends in this book, is to ignore a key element of the national experience. In this book, a survey of American foreign policy from the late 18th century to the present day, Herring seeks to demonstrate the role international relations have played in shaping our nation’s history. It is one, he argues, that has been long influenced by Americans’ self-perception of themselves as a chosen people living in a nation with a unique and special place in the world. This belief often is often tempered by pragmatism, however, as Americans frequently subordinated their ideals to the realities of the situation and their own economic self interest.

These elements were present at the nation’s birth. Claiming its independence in a document filled with assertions of rights, the revolutionary government soon found itself in an alliance with France, only recently a hated foe of the colonists and an embodiment of much the revolutionaries opposed. Yet such a partnership was necessary given the United States’s weakness in the early decades of the nation’s existence, which was hardly assured. Once it was, however, the justifications of idealism and pragmatism united as U.S. foreign policy turned towards the goal of extending the nation’s borders. Americans cited their sense of national mission and destiny to explain their acquisition of new lands to themselves and others. Even the bloody internecine conflict of the Civil War slowed the country’s growth only temporarily, and by the late 19th century the focus widened from the Western Hemisphere to establishing a global presence.

The increasing economic predominance of the U.S. in the world, however, was not mirrored at first by a concomitant involvement in international politics. Though Woodrow Wilson brought to the presidency a desire to spread American ideals abroad, his effort to involve the country in the League of Nations was rejected by the public after the First World War. It was not until the Second World War that foreign policy again became a dominant concern for the American people, one perpetuated by the postwar insecurity of the Cold War. Here Herring loses the proverbial forest for the trees, as his thesis recedes amidst the details of the multifaceted struggle with the Soviet Union. Yet even the United States’s ultimate victory and its status as the world’s “hyperpower” did not offer a guarantee of safety from global threats, as the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 demonstrated. After examining the policies that followed the attacks, Herring concludes by arguing for an abandonment of long-held hubristic ideals and the embracing of the pragmatic tradition as the best means of addressing the U.S.’s concerns in today’s rapidly changing world.

Herring’s books is a sweeping and comprehensive account of America’s interaction with the world. Though his focus is on United States foreign policy, he addresses as well the broader relationship between its citizens and the world, a dynamic that both drives national policy and is influenced by it. His coverage is impressive, as he succeeds in addressing the major foreign policy concerns while not letting them overshadow America’s simultaneous relations with other nations. With two-thirds of his text covering American foreign policy in the 20th century, some might quibble with his emphasis on the past hundred years, yet such a focus is understandable given Herring’s background as a historian of post-Second World War policy and his narrative never bogs down in detail as a consequence. Overall, this book provides an incomparable examination of nearly two and a half centuries of American foreign policy, one that will enlighten readers familiar with the topic as well as those seeking an introduction to the subject. ( )
  MacDad | Mar 27, 2020 |
Very thorough, detailed history of U.S. foreign policy and relations. Author has combined interesting insights with staggering depth for one volume study. A tad much for me, but I'll keep this one in mind for further research. ( )
  HadriantheBlind | Mar 30, 2013 |
As the 12th volume to the Oxford History of the US, one would expect high quality work which this one is a very good read for the most part. His assessment from the Carter years to the George W Bush years, however, are less credible due to his rather injudicious use of the New York Times as a credible source, especially for the Clinton & G.W. Bush years which one wonders whether he stopped being historian & turned partisan pundit once he got to the Clinton years. ( )
  wcsdm3 | Jan 27, 2013 |
4544. From Colony to Superpower U.S. Foreign Relations since 1776, by George C. Herring (read 10 Mar 2009) This is a stunningly good book, covering American foreign policy from 1776 to 2008. I found myself agreeing with nearly all the judgments which the author makes, especially his view on George W. Bush and his disastrous foreign policies. And one cannot but be pleased to read about the years 1988 to 1991, when Gorbachev made things happen in the world for which we can all be grateful. ( )
  Schmerguls | Mar 10, 2009 |
A Fantastic Survey

Part of the Oxford History of the United States Series, this survey text of American foreign policy since the revolution is both comprehensive and in depth. This would be the perfect book for an undergraduate course on the history of American foreign policy.

George C. Herring's writing is fluid yet incredibly descriptive. At 1000+ pages, the book is a mammoth to get through, but for a college history class, is definitely manageable over a semester. I was really surprised at not only how accurate and nuanced the entire book was, but Herring was even able to include certain elements that I was even surprised with. Herring also includes some very detailed maps of all the major conflict zones, definitely helps in the spatial contextualization.

Overall, I can think of no finer text than "From Colony to Superpower" in educating oneself about the foreign policy of the most important country in the world today. Definitely recommend it for either a survey course, or even just as a reference book. ( )
  bruchu | Feb 7, 2009 |
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The Oxford History of the United States is the most respected multi-volume history of our nation in print. The series includes three Pulitzer Prize-winners, a New York Times bestseller, and winners of prestigious Bancroft and Parkman Prizes. From Colony to Superpower is the only thematic volume commissioned for the series. Here George C. Herring uses foreign relations as the lens through which to tell the story of America's dramatic rise from thirteen disparate colonies huddled along the Atlantic coast to the world's greatest superpower. A sweeping account of United States' foreign relations and diplomacy, this magisterial volume documents America's interaction with other peoples and nations of the world. Herring tells a story of stunning successes and sometimes tragic failures, captured in a fast-paced narrative that illuminates the central importance of foreign relations to the existence and survival of the nation, and highlights its ongoing impact on the lives of ordinary citizens. He shows how policymakers defined American interests broadly to include territorial expansion, access to growing markets, and the spread of an "American way" of life. And Herring does all this in a story rich in human drama and filled with epic events. Statesmen such as Benjamin Franklin and Woodrow Wilson and Harry Truman and Dean Acheson played key roles in America's rise to world power. But America's expansion as a nation also owes much to the adventurers and explorers, the sea captains, merchants and captains of industry, the missionaries and diplomats, who discovered or charted new lands, developed new avenues of commerce, and established and defended the nation's interests in foreign lands. From the American Revolution to the fifty-year struggle with communism and conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq, From Colony to Superpower tells the dramatic story of America's emergence as superpower--its birth in revolution, its troubled present, and its uncertain future.

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