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The Dark Tower (The Dark Tower, #7) de…
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The Dark Tower (The Dark Tower, #7) (2004 original; edició 2006)

de Stephen King

Sèrie: The Dark Tower (7)

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaMencions
9,284165607 (4.12)298
All good things must come to an end, Constant Reader, and not even Stephen King can make a story that goes on forever. The tale of Roland Deschain's relentless quest for the Dark Tower has, the author fears, sorely tried the patience of those who have followed it from its earliest chapters. But attend to it a while longer, if it pleases you, for this volume is the last, and often the last things are best. Roland's ka-tet remains intact, though scattered over wheres and whens. Susannah-Mia has been carried from the Dixie Pig (in the summer of 1999) to a birthing room -- really a chamber of horrors -- in Thunderclap's Fedic; Jake and Father Callahan, with Oy between them, have entered the restaurant on Lex and Sixty-first with weapons drawn, little knowing how numerous and noxious are their foes. Roland and Eddie are with John Cullum in Maine, in 1977, looking for the site on Turtleback Lane where "walk-ins" have been often seen. They want desperately to get back to the others, to Susannah especially, and yet they have come to realize that the world they need to escape is the only one that matters. Thus the book opens, like a door to the uttermost reaches of Stephen King's imagination. You've come this far. Come a little farther. Come all the way. The sound you hear may be the slamming of the door behind you. Welcome to The Dark Tower.… (més)
Membre:redkian
Títol:The Dark Tower (The Dark Tower, #7)
Autors:Stephen King
Informació:Pocket Books, Paperback, 1050 pages
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca, Read
Valoració:**
Etiquetes:No n'hi ha cap

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The Dark Tower de Stephen King (2004)

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Anglès (154)  Castellà (3)  Danès (2)  Noruec (2)  Francès (1)  Portuguès (Portugal) (1)  Italià (1)  Neerlandès (1)  Totes les llengües (165)
Es mostren 1-5 de 165 (següent | mostra-les totes)
I'm so happy it's over. Stephen King is not a writer for me.

Well, reading this added another experience. And the lesson is that don't read series or books where it's obvious that the author doesn't have a plan himself for the book series. These books were at places good but mostly just a sequence of word with no content, no message and no entertaining value. The common theme seemed to be "steal something form a book, song or movie" rather than an intrinsic red thread. That the books are based on a poem "Child Roland to the Dark Tower came" is repeated so many times without it being true in anything but the most weak way.

Anything good with this book? The absence of the ridiculous repetitions of "19" present in the previous book, and it's not good when the absence of something is a book's main quality. ( )
  bratell | Dec 25, 2020 |
I really wanted to finish this before the new year, say true, but it was not meant to be.

There's probably something that could be said about the metafictional aspects – perhaps something akin to Heinlein's ideas of "pantheistic solipsism" and "world as myth" – of the later books of the Dark Tower series, but I'm not sure there's much value in saying it. There is too much nodding and winking to one's self (almost literally, in a few spots), and there are far too many words expended in finishing this tale: Their inflationary nature devalues the parts of the story that were worth anything to begin with.

I will begrudgingly admit that I like the ending, the true ending that is, not the several false ones. It doesn't make up for the terribleness of the movie that came out last year, but it does allow for a certain circularity that beckons "many minds and hands," to borrow a Tolkienian phrase.

It was good to have read it, but having read it, I do not anticipate ever wanting to read it again. ( )
  octoberdad | Dec 16, 2020 |
A really satisfying conclusion, except for one thing. THERE IS SO MUCH STEPHEN KING IN THIS BOOK. The parts that aren't about Stephen King are wonderful and interesting and enjoyable to read. But. It was the most irritating thing in the world that half the plot revolved around the character King when his presence in previous books was not only boring but also kind of ridiculous. Each bit that talked about how that folksy author Stephen King is practically the key to saving this world and many others made me want to find him and poke him with a pointy stick. They also knocked a star off my rating.

All the parts that were about our main characters being their interesting, well drawn selves were a joy to read. Even the sad or weird or gross parts were fun to read. So that makes it worth it, I suppose. If you were wondering. ( )
  bookbrig | Aug 5, 2020 |
I loved this book and the entire series. Here is my take on the ending.

Spoilers to follow.

There is a theme throughout the series of various works coming to life, King's other stories, Star Wars, Harry Potter, Patrick's drawings, etc. And this series has come to life because you and I are reading it.

Roland must go back to the beginning and start everything anew every time someone picks up The Gunslinger. Roland's quest won't be over until the last person finishes The Dark Tower for the last time.
( )
1 vota SethBowman | Jul 31, 2020 |
So. I've been sitting here staring at this screen for about 2 hours after finishing The Dark Tower. It was pretty touch-and-go for a bit.

I couldn't see much through the tears.

But I'm back now. It's not like this is the first time I read the book. I had a book hangover then, also, but I think I'm recovering slightly better than that last time.

I'm afraid I can't say ANYTHING about this book without going into spoiler territory. It's brilliant and it's epic, of course, and it keeps blowing my mind over and over and over again right before it tears out my heart and stamps all over it again and again and again... but by the end, I'm saying to myself,

"Go then, there are other worlds than these..."

I DIED when Eddie and Jake died. When Oy sacrificed himself to fight Mordred, I also died. When Susannah left, finally taking the path AWAY FROM Samsara, I died, because all that was left was an artist, Roland, and Oy.

She gave up on him. Of course, there were the dreams and the DT sung to all the Ka-Tet, but still. Roland started his obsession alone and he ended alone, a victim of his own obsession. Or rather, not quite alone. The Crimson King joins him in his obsession. Forever. Time runs backward there, and as we learn later, it repeats.

What really freaks me out is the fact that Roland could have relied on the artist to erase the Crimson King entirely, kill evil forever, and yet Roland instead plucks a rose that serves as AN ENTIRE UNIVERSE, sacrificing it, having his blood mix with it, in order to blind the Crimson King before the great erasure. But it was this great evil of Roland's, along with the painting, that lets the Crimson King endure. Just his eyes, of course, but because he got painted with the Blood of Eld and the sacrifice of an entire universe, Roland ensures that his and the Crimson King's obsession endures forever.

The climb up the tower, his reliving his past, brought him back 34 years to the darkest point of his hopeless obsession, ever and forever coming back to the Dark Tower. Where do I get the 34 years? Roland and Stephen King are the same man. King wrote this Cycle between 1970 and 2004. It was his grand obsession, and he wrote himself, sometimes humorously and often as a victim of his own hubris, right into the Dark Tower in a very meta and awesomely brilliant way.

So. Who is who? Roland? Crimson King? Or Stephen King? They are all victims of their obsession, and their child, either metaphorically or TRULY, is Mordred, the complete body of Stephen King's writing.

Which, if you recall, brings in SO MUCH of the Dark Tower mythos.

So let's look at the deaths of our great antagonists who all serve the beam. Walter dies, is consumed by SK's bibliography. Mordred grapples with Oy, the last member of Roland's Ka-Tet, which, you should remember, is part dog. And SK has made a point of directing us to the reversibility of Dog as God. Roland and SK take a final parting shot at SK's body of work and kills him (it).

The Crimson King, the greatest evil in all universes, across all universes, is left with nothing more than two red eyes that will never die in the hub of all universes. This is SK telling us that as the beams regenerate and the Dark Tower brings magic back into all worlds, the seeds for new evil (And New Stories) will always be waiting in the wings.

And Roland? Well, SK's writing obsession will never end.


And with that, I beg your pardon. That I do.

I needed to say something REAL about this book that affected me soooo damn much. Still affects me. It's one of the most brilliant works I've ever read, together with the rest of the cycle.

Sure, there are some things that aren't all that good, but EVERYTHING SERVES THE BEAM. And the beam, the Dark Tower itself, is GOOD. For all the things I could complain about, the really awesome aspects FAR OUTWEIGH the bad... and so much so that I'm left giddy and lost in tears.

Say what you will, but these books are something truly memorable.

One more thing:

My edition of The Dark Tower has a picture of Roland carrying an uprooted rose at the base of the Dark Tower. This has got to be one of the most fucked up and nasty covers in history. I mean, it looks rather pretty, right? But what we're looking at is Roland SACRIFICING A WHOLE UNIVERSE, just like he let Jake die, in order to GET to the Dark Tower. This is SIN. Roland's sin. Endlessly repeated. He will never learn his lesson. A universe among so many universes is not so great a price, IS IT?

Of course, that universe could have been ours. Or another Keystone Earth. But what does he care? He is deep in the throes of his obsession.

Kind of like being a writer. Pouring your soul into your work and yet you always get shat on, and yet you keep writing. And writing. And writing. You may try to balance what you do against the needs of life, and Roland DID try to change, to love his Ka-Tet, to be a wonderfully rounded human being, but in the end, he chose writing over his friends and his family and Gan. And paid the price.

*shiver*

( )
  bradleyhorner | Jun 1, 2020 |
Es mostren 1-5 de 165 (següent | mostra-les totes)
N 1970, when he was 22, Stephen King wrote a sentence he liked: ''The man in black fled across the desert, and the gunslinger followed.'' It's an innocent sentence -- pulpy and suggestive -- but it grew to become a monster. As the first line in the ''Dark Tower'' series, it begins a story King intended to be the longest popular novel in history. With the publication of ''The Dark Tower VII,'' the series has topped the 4,000-page mark and, mercifully, reached its conclusion.
afegit per stephmo | editaNew York Times, Michael Agger (Oct 17, 2004)
 
King's "The Dark Tower" is the culmination of a saga that spans 3,000 pages, seven primary volumes, at least 15 ancillary ones and more than three decades of effort on the part of its author.
 

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Nom de l'autorCàrrecTipus d'autorObra?Estat
King, Stephenautor primaritotes les edicionsconfirmat
Bergner, WulfTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Guidall, GeorgeNarradorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Whelan, MichaelIl·lustradorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
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Not hear? When noise was everywhere! it tolled / Increasing like a bell. Names in my ears / Of all the lost adventurers, my peers -- / How such a one was strong, and such was bold, / And such was fortunate, yet each of old / Lost, lost! one moment knelled the woe of years. // There they stood, ranged along the hillsides, met / To view the last of me, a living frame / For one more picture! In a sheet of flame / I saw them and I knew them all. And yet / Dauntless the slug-horn to my lips I set, / And blew. 'Childe Roland to the Dark Tower came.' -- Robert Browning, "Childe Roland to the Dark Tower Came"
I was born / Six-gun in my hand, / behind a gun/ I'll make my final stand. -- Bad Company
What have I become? / My sweetest friend / Everyone I know / Goes away in the end / You could have it all / My empire of dirt / I will let you down / I will make you hurt. -- Trent Reznor
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He who speaks without an attentive ear is mute. Therefore, Constant Reader, this final book in the Dark Tower cycle is dedicated to you. Long days and pleasant nights.
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Pere Don Callahan had once been the Catholic priest of a town, 'Salem's Lot had been it's name, that no longer existed on any map.
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He was aware that his hands had rolled themselves into fists, but only because he could feel his carefully cared-for nails biting into his palms.
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(Clica-hi per mostrar-ho. Compte: pot anticipar-te quin és el desenllaç de l'obra.)
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Wikipedia en anglès (1)

All good things must come to an end, Constant Reader, and not even Stephen King can make a story that goes on forever. The tale of Roland Deschain's relentless quest for the Dark Tower has, the author fears, sorely tried the patience of those who have followed it from its earliest chapters. But attend to it a while longer, if it pleases you, for this volume is the last, and often the last things are best. Roland's ka-tet remains intact, though scattered over wheres and whens. Susannah-Mia has been carried from the Dixie Pig (in the summer of 1999) to a birthing room -- really a chamber of horrors -- in Thunderclap's Fedic; Jake and Father Callahan, with Oy between them, have entered the restaurant on Lex and Sixty-first with weapons drawn, little knowing how numerous and noxious are their foes. Roland and Eddie are with John Cullum in Maine, in 1977, looking for the site on Turtleback Lane where "walk-ins" have been often seen. They want desperately to get back to the others, to Susannah especially, and yet they have come to realize that the world they need to escape is the only one that matters. Thus the book opens, like a door to the uttermost reaches of Stephen King's imagination. You've come this far. Come a little farther. Come all the way. The sound you hear may be the slamming of the door behind you. Welcome to The Dark Tower.

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