IniciGrupsConversesExplora
Cerca al lloc
Aquest lloc utilitza galetes per a oferir els nostres serveis, millorar el desenvolupament, per a anàlisis i (si no has iniciat la sessió) per a publicitat. Utilitzant LibraryThing acceptes que has llegit i entès els nostres Termes de servei i política de privacitat. L'ús que facis del lloc i dels seus serveis està subjecte a aquestes polítiques i termes.

Resultats de Google Books

Clica una miniatura per anar a Google Books.

S'està carregant…

Epopeia de Guilgameix

de Anonymous, Gilgamesh Poet (Autor)

Altres autors: Mira la secció altres autors.

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaConverses / Mencions
9,213113739 (3.79)2 / 181
The story of Gilgamesh, an ancient epic poem written on clay tablets in a cuneiform alphabet, is as fascinating and moving as it is crucial to our ability to fathom the time and the place in which it was written. Gardner's version restores the poetry of the text and the lyricism that is lost in the earlier, almost scientific renderings. The principal theme of the poem is a familiar one: man's persistent and hopeless quest for immortality. It tells of the heroic exploits of an ancient ruler of the walled city of Uruk named Gilgamesh. Included in its story is an account of the Flood that predates the Biblical version by centuries. Gilgamesh and his companion, a wild man of the woods named Enkidu, fight monsters and demonic powers in search of honor and lasting fame. When Enkidu is put to death by the vengeful goddess Ishtar, Gilgamesh travels to the underworld to find an answer to his grief and confront the question of mortality.… (més)
S'està carregant…

Apunta't a LibraryThing per saber si aquest llibre et pot agradar.

» Mira també 181 mencions

Es mostren 1-5 de 113 (següent | mostra-les totes)
This collection contains translations of both the Akkadian and Sumerian versions of the Gilgamesh epic along with Sumerian poems about Gilgamesh (Bilgames in the Sumerian language) that relate to, but are not part of, the epic itself. Gilgamesh was an actual person, a king, who ruled sometime between the pre-historic and historic age. Stories about him were handed down as part of the oral tradition. During the long conversion process from oral to written language, Gilgamesh transformed from a flesh and blood human to part-god and part-mortal. His mother, Ninsun, was a goddess and his father, Lugalbanda, was the deified king of Uruk.

The Standard Version of the poem was complied in the Akkadian language sometime in the first millennium BCE possibly by the writer Sîn-lique-unnini. This version is considered to be ‘the classic’ Epic of Gilgamesh. Akkadian texts older than the standard version are also included in Andrew George’s book. These were written in cuneiform script by scribes on school practice tablets. The Sumerian poems about Bilgames from the 18th century BCE come from Babylon (present-day Iraq).

I enjoyed reading the poetry itself and found the introduction by Andrew George to be terrific. He has a knack for explaining human behavior and beliefs from over 4,000 years ago that have stayed with us. The themes he discusses, particularly the role of gods, kings, and subjects, as well as rituals and respect for the dead, resonated with me because they explain why we do some of the things we do without thinking about why. For example why the concepts of service and duty are so important to a monarch (Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth comes to mind), or why the practice of tending to the graves of the dead or ritualizing remembrances continue today and are as much for ourselves as they are for our dead ancestors. Thousands of years ago, these behaviors and beliefs were ingrained in humanity (or at least in what we now call ‘western’ people) and have remained fundamentally with us even if the particulars have changed.

I read Gilgamesh a bit out of order. The epic is roughly two or three thousand years older than The Iliad. What was notable are the parallels between Gilgamesh and Achilles. Both are exceedingly strong warriors, held up to be examples of the ‘ideal man’. Both are consumed by a hopeless mission. And both have a male companion of lower rank who teaches them lessons about hubris, love, and loss.

The Gilgamesh epic is also famous for its reference to ‘the Deluge’. The flood story is a common theme in ancient literature if for no other reason than the confluence of the Tigris, Euphrates, and Diyala rivers would have made massive flooding an annual occurrence in lower Mesopotamia. It is no wonder the story of a flood to end all floods, whether it be the Deluge from Gilgamesh or Noah’s Flood, would be connected with the gods, or God, and have major influence on how people behaved and what they believed. Gilgamesh’s adventure to meet the lone survivor of The Deluge (Uta-Napishti) and the description of the flood and its after effects made a personal impression on me. I come from a home town that was devastated by a flood thirteen years before I was born. Growing up, the Flood of ‘55 was regularly discussed, and continues to be discussed almost 70 years later. It had a permanent psychological and behavioral impact on those who survived it and the generations that followed them. It is no wonder then, that the Gilgamesh story has remained relevant to this day. It’s universal themes make it a must-read for anyone interested in many of the foundational concepts of the culture in which we live. ( )
  Mortybanks | Jan 10, 2023 |
Simply put, Gilgamesh: A Verse Narrative (Hardcover) by Herbert Mason, which I just finished reading, was amazing. I was motivated to reading it by the story of Noah, covered at Torah Study this past Saturday, and immediately went to the library to procure a copy. I started it yesterday and finished it in a day.

As is well-known the coverage of the Biblical flood in both the Gilgamesh epic and the Noah story have striking similarities. Less well-known are dream interpretations similar to the story of Joseph. As is explained in various "afterwords" the Gilgamesh epic is recorded in primitive written form in various Cuneiform tablets. Scholars have been piecing together Gilgamesh for roughly a century, give or take.

A deep and abiding part of the epic is the tender tale of the end of a friendship between Gilgamesh and Enkidu. One of the most touching lines in my opinion, among many, about the end of friendship, in this case by death was: "You to wander on alone? Is that the way it is with friend(s)?

The discussions of this book are rife with arguments as to its historical accuracy, the quality of the translation, and the compiler/translator's understanding of ancient polytheism. My response is that none of us are an "ancient polytheist" and that all ancient epics, such as the Odyssey, have to be treasured for what they are, literature, and for historical accuracy taken with lots of leavening, whether grains of salt or otherwise.
( )
  JBGUSA | Jan 2, 2023 |
2018 AP/DC IV Summer Reading:

I always seem to love returning and returning to the beginning of written words, and to all the twists and turns they take. This earliest story thousands of years before our bible, which contains stories that would then be reflected later in the bible. The way early myths echo into and out of each other. The flood, the snake, the birthed-exigency of intelligence/self-awareness on the altar of sex.

It was nice to have a refresher on this one. ( )
  wanderlustlover | Dec 26, 2022 |
Gilgamesj vertalen blijkt een heikele onderneming: er bestaan zoveel verschillende versies van dit verhaal, uit zoveel verschillende tijdsperioden (gespreid over 2 millennia), en soms erg onvolledig overgeleverd. Zoals Michael Schmidt terecht schrijft (The Life of a Poem): Gilgamesh vertalen is een ongelofelijk puzzelwerk, waarbij voortdurende interpretatie aangewezen is, uitmondend in een eindeloos schuivende tekst die onvermijdelijk sterk gekleurd is door de eigen inbreng van de vertaler/lezer.
Als je de geschiedenis bekijkt van het ontstaan, de herontdekking en de reconstructie van dit verhaal, dan gaat het je zeker als historicus gewoon duizelen. Neem alvast de tijd tussen het oudste fragment dat we hebben teruggevonden (ca 2100 BCE) en de Standaardversie die ergens tussen 1300 en 1100 BCE werd samengesteld: ruim duizend jaar. Of de tijd tussen die Standaardversie en de meest volledige versie die is teruggevonden in de Bibliotheek van Assurbanipal in Niniveh, ca 650 BCE: grosso modo 500 jaar. In mijn eigen opleiding geschiedenis hadden we een (kleine) cursus paleografie waarin ons duidelijk werd gemaakt hoe vlug scribenten uit de Middeleeuwen fouten maakten of zelfs bewust aanvullingen of veranderingen deden, telkens ze een tekst kopieerden; op vrij korte tijd kon zo een grotendeels ‘corrupte’ tekst ontstaan. Wat moet dat dan niet geweest zijn voor de Mesopotamische periode, waarin teksten continu gekopieerd werden, dat wil zeggen telkens opnieuw met spijkerschrift-stiften ingedrukt in zachte klei, dikwijls door leerlingen in scholen, bij wijze van oefening? Elke vertaling van het Gilgamesh-verhaal, op basis van de originele teksten, is dan ook een huzarenstukje, en elke vertaler maakt dan ook telkens weer eigen keuzes die uitmonden in zeer verschillende teksten. Deze vertaling van de Standaardversie, door de Nederlandse Assyrioloog Herman Vanstiphout, vind ik erg geslaagd want erg dicht bij de originelen aanleunend, aangevuld met oudere fragmenten, en rijk van extra toelichting voorzien via voetnoten en begeleidende in- en uitleidingen. Als extra biedt hij zelfs vertaalde fragmenten aan van de oudste Gilgamesj-versies (toen nog Bilgames) uit de Soemerische en Oud-babylonische tijd (2100-1500 BCE). In mijn Geschiedenis-account op Goodreads ga ik dieper in op inhoudelijke en vormelijke aspecten die me zo aantrokken in dit verhaal en in deze vertaling: https://www.goodreads.com/review/list/26055396. ( )
  bookomaniac | Sep 9, 2022 |
Assembled from various fragments, this is thought to be the earliest "literature. Plot concenrs the heros encounters with lust, friendship, loss, and death. There are a couple of moving passages about grief and the quest for meaning.
This edition has extensive glossary for all the names of gods, etc. as well as a pretty scholarly (dense, detailed) introduction. ( )
  brianstagner | Jul 10, 2022 |
Es mostren 1-5 de 113 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Sense ressenyes | afegeix-hi una ressenya

» Afegeix-hi altres autors (85 possibles)

Nom de l'autorCàrrecTipus d'autorObra?Estat
Anonymousautor primaritotes les edicionsconfirmat
Gilgamesh PoetAutorautor principaltotes les edicionsconfirmat
Burckhardt, GeorgTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Ferry, DavidTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Feyter, Theo deTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Gardner, JohnTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Guidall, GeorgeNarradorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Hämeen-Anttila, JaakkoTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Henshaw, Richard A.Traductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Jastrow, MorrisEditorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Kantola, TainaTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Kapheim, ThomIl·lustradorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Kovacs, Maureen GalleryTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Maier, JohnTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Marks, John H.Epílegautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Mason, HerbertTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Maul, Stefan M.Traductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Mitchell, StephenTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Muss-Arnolt, WilliamTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Pasco, RichardNarradorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Salonen, ArmasTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Sandars, N. K.Traductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Sîn-lēqi-unninniEditorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Schott, AlbertTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Soden, Wolfram vonTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Thompson, Reginald CampbellTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Vanstiphout, HermanTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Warring, LennartTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Westerman, FrankEpílegautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Wyatt, Thomasautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Has d'iniciar sessió per poder modificar les dades del coneixement compartit.
Si et cal més ajuda, mira la pàgina d'ajuda del coneixement compartit.
Títol normalitzat
Títol original
Títols alternatius
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Data original de publicació
Gent/Personatges
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Llocs importants
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Esdeveniments importants
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Pel·lícules relacionades
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Premis i honors
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Epígraf
Dedicatòria
Primeres paraules
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
I will proclaim to the world the deeds of Gilgamesh. ...

trans. N.K. Sandars (1960)
It is an old story
But one that can still be told
About a man who loved
And lost a friend to death
And learned he lacked the power
To bring him back to life.

trans. Mason (1972)
The Story
of him who knew the most of all men know;
who made the journey; heartbroken; reconciled;

who knew the way things were before the Flood,
the secret things, the mystery; who went

to the end of the earth, and over; who returned,
and wrote the story on a tablet of stone.

trans. Ferry (1992)
He who saw the Deep, the country's foundation,
    (who) knew . . . , was wise in all matters!
(Gilgamesh, who) saw the Deep, the country's foundation
   (who) knew . . . , was wise in all matters!

(He) . . . everywhere . . .
   and (learnt) of everything the sum of wisdom. 
He saw what was secret, discovered what was hidden. 
   he brought back a tale of before the Deluge.

trans. George (1999) 
He had seen everything, had experienced all emotions,
from exaltation to despair, had been granted a vision
into the great mystery, the secret places,
the primeval days before the Flood. ...

trans. Mitchell (2004)
Citacions
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
To be sure, the lonely frustrations of the survivors is the same after every death, immorally or otherwise caused. And everyone is wise in saying, There is nothing you can do; but such wisdom does not reconcile any of us really to loss, for we knew the other as a person in himself not as an abstraction we could do without. We lost the one who we didn't realize enabled us to live in other people's worlds; now we have only our own private world and the almost herculean task of constructing a human reentry. [...]

Two friends in Paris helped me to understand two essential ingredients of Wisdom, the third ingredient being acceptance, referred to before, which one can only come by within oneself on one's return.

(Herbert Mason's Afterword to the Mariner edition, pp. 110-111)
(Utnapishtim speaking to Gilgamesh) [...]I would grieve
At all that may befall you still
If I did not know you must return
And bury your own loss and build
Your world anew with your own hands.

(from the Herbert Mason translation)
Darreres paraules
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
(Clica-hi per mostrar-ho. Compte: pot anticipar-te quin és el desenllaç de l'obra.)
(Clica-hi per mostrar-ho. Compte: pot anticipar-te quin és el desenllaç de l'obra.)
(Clica-hi per mostrar-ho. Compte: pot anticipar-te quin és el desenllaç de l'obra.)
(Clica-hi per mostrar-ho. Compte: pot anticipar-te quin és el desenllaç de l'obra.)
(Clica-hi per mostrar-ho. Compte: pot anticipar-te quin és el desenllaç de l'obra.)
Nota de desambiguació
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
This work is any complete, unabridged translation of the Standard Version of The Epic of Gilgamesh. To quote the FAQ on combining - "A work brings together all different copies of a book, regardless of edition, title variation, or language." Translations of the Old Babylonian Versions should remain separate, as should translations of the early Sumerian Gilgamesh stories and poems from which the epic came to be.
Based on currently accepted LibraryThing convention, the Norton Critical Edition is treated as a separate work, ostensibly due to the extensive additional, original material included.
Editor de l'editorial
Creadors de notes promocionals a la coberta
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Llengua original
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
CDD/SMD canònics
LCC canònic
The story of Gilgamesh, an ancient epic poem written on clay tablets in a cuneiform alphabet, is as fascinating and moving as it is crucial to our ability to fathom the time and the place in which it was written. Gardner's version restores the poetry of the text and the lyricism that is lost in the earlier, almost scientific renderings. The principal theme of the poem is a familiar one: man's persistent and hopeless quest for immortality. It tells of the heroic exploits of an ancient ruler of the walled city of Uruk named Gilgamesh. Included in its story is an account of the Flood that predates the Biblical version by centuries. Gilgamesh and his companion, a wild man of the woods named Enkidu, fight monsters and demonic powers in search of honor and lasting fame. When Enkidu is put to death by the vengeful goddess Ishtar, Gilgamesh travels to the underworld to find an answer to his grief and confront the question of mortality.

No s'han trobat descripcions de biblioteca.

Descripció del llibre
Sumari haiku

Cobertes populars

Dreceres

Valoració

Mitjana: (3.79)
0.5 1
1 18
1.5 4
2 81
2.5 19
3 343
3.5 59
4 469
4.5 40
5 323

Ets tu?

Fes-te Autor del LibraryThing.

Penguin Australia

Penguin Australia ha publicat 2 edicions d'aquest llibre.

Edicions: 014044100X, 0140449191

 

Quant a | Contacte | LibraryThing.com | Privadesa/Condicions | Ajuda/PMF | Blog | Botiga | APIs | TinyCat | Biblioteques llegades | Crítics Matiners | Coneixement comú | 182,819,876 llibres! | Barra superior: Sempre visible