IniciGrupsConversesMésTendències
Cerca al lloc
Aquest lloc utilitza galetes per a oferir els nostres serveis, millorar el desenvolupament, per a anàlisis i (si no has iniciat la sessió) per a publicitat. Utilitzant LibraryThing acceptes que has llegit i entès els nostres Termes de servei i política de privacitat. L'ús que facis del lloc i dels seus serveis està subjecte a aquestes polítiques i termes.
Hide this

Resultats de Google Books

Clica una miniatura per anar a Google Books.

S'està carregant…

Eat the Document (2006)

de Dana Spiotta

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaMencions
5031636,000 (3.53)8
In the heyday of the 1970s underground, Bobby DeSoto and Mary Whittaker-passionate, idealistic, and in love-design a series of radical protests against the Vietnam War. When one action goes wrong, the course of their lives is forever changed. The two must erase their past, forge new identities, and never see each other again. Now it is the 1990s. Mary lives in the suburbs with her fifteen-year-old son, who spends hours immersed in the music of his mother's generation. She has no idea where Bobby is, whether he is alive or dead. Shifting between the protests in the 1970s and the consequences of those choices in the 1990s, Dana Spiotta deftly explores the connection between the two eras-their language, technology, music, and activism. Character-driven and brilliant, this is an important and revelatory novel about the culture of rebellion, with particular resonance now.… (més)
S'està carregant…

Apunta't a LibraryThing per saber si aquest llibre et pot agradar.

No hi ha cap discussió a Converses sobre aquesta obra.

» Mira també 8 mencions

Es mostren 1-5 de 16 (següent | mostra-les totes)
This is a perfectly mediocre book, reasonably entertaining, but absolutely wonderful for understanding today's literature. Its successes and its flaws are all so widespread, it's as if I'd found the Platonic form of the Contemporary Novel. Which means this review got a little out of hand.

**

I periodically fall victim to an odd complex of ideas when choosing a book to read:

* that because a novel is supposed to be about important themes, it will treat them as if they were important.
* that a novel ostensibly about history will be about history.
* that a novel about radicalism will take some risks.
* that a novel ostensibly about ideas will be more intelligent than the average novel.

EtheD seems to be well loved, but I can't at all work out why.* Like Jennifer Egan's 'Look at Me,' it's a philosophical novel with all the philosophy taken out; it raises very important questions (here: the history/decline of political radicalism on the one hand, and the morality of revolution on the other), but can't stay in one place for long enough to tease out that idea in any interesting way.

The book's structure makes real thought impossible: the main reveal (there are others) is just what our main characters did back in the 70s. They blew up a house with a housemaid in it. Was it worth doing? Since we don't know what they did until the last twenty pages, there's not much time to think about it. I suspect we're meant to be instinctively disgusted by this act. The characters keep insisting that "intentions matter", but ultimately they accept their guilt and go to prison. Meanwhile, we're told that we have to see the complexities of the owners of the homes they blew up, i.e., sometimes you just have to make chemicals that cause cancer and sell them to people. Sometimes you just have to make weapons and sell them and it's not up to you if others use them. They're just so complex!

"That's the truth. I showed the truth. The truth is complicated. More complicated than we would like," Bobby said.

The novel's form also makes it hard to really think with. As with *so many* contemporary books, we have a rotating point of view, one character per chapter, with only very, very occasional dips into a more distant third person perspective. In other words, the narrator does all s/he can to efface itself. The only perspectives we get are the characters'.

But at heart the book doesn't want us to think about the morality of radicalism, because that question has already been answered. Instead it wants us to think about the changes between the sixties and seventies and the 2000s. Then, we had radicals who would fight for a cause and set out on their own adventures and try to live free. Now, we have cynics who'll sell out as soon as is humanly possible. Then, we had the Beach Boys. Now, we fetishize the Beach Boys (and the rest of 60s and 70s pop music), because instead of being good consumers, we're really bad consumers (???)

There is a lot to like about the book, too. The sheer breadth of the themes destroy the limits of contemporary literature; you just can't write a book about this stuff that is also just a love story--so the love story is overwhelmed by the story about a chemical company and an adbuster. There is a good depiction of the slide from Flower Power Hope and Smiling to internet cynicism and merely symbolic protest of the "being sad is subversive" or "free yourself from your mind-chains" type. There's good stuff about how nostalgia is merely personal, never political. There's a hint that the main characters' real crime wasn't accidentally killing a woman so much as it was giving birth to the idiocies of the late twentieth century.

But really all of this is overwhelmed by the love story. EtheD is somehow sprawling (so many strands! so much jumping around in time!) and obsessively limited (it's really about true love). It's both perfectly historical (seventies communes! noughties vinyl collectors!) and entirely unrealistic. It's perfectly formed (the characters all have their own convincing PoV; the reveals are spaced out) and a complete mess (the multiple reveals have nothing to do with each other). It tries to write about group dynamics and historical change by focusing on individual identities and family relationships.

Spiotta tried to do the impossible here: write a novel in a contemporary form that didn't stick to domestic/romantic/existential maunderings. Since Stone Arabia is about rock music and siblings, I suspect she tried to do the same thing there. Perhaps she pulled it off? I'll give it a try.


* That's not true, I know exactly why: it's a perfectly generic novel about something cool and interesting. There's a place for that. More often than I will admit, I love novels that are about something in which I'm interested, even if they're really mediocre in every other way. ( )
  stillatim | Oct 23, 2020 |
In der Hochphase der amerikanischen Anti-Vietnamkriegsbewegung der Siebzigerjahre verüben Mary Whittaker und ihr Freund Bobby de Soto, ein junger Filmemacher, einen Anschlag auf die Villa eines Waffenfabrikanten. Unglücklicherweise kommt dabei dessen Haushälterin ums Leben. Ein tragischer Unfall, den niemand gewollt hat, aber Mary und Bobby müssen sich daraufhin trennen und untertauchen. Für Mary beginnt nun eine Odyssee, die sie unter immer neuen Namen erst in eine alternative Wohngemeinschaft, dann in eine radikalfeministische Kommune und schließlich in eine unscheinbare bürgerliche Existenz in einem Vorort von Seattle führt. Trotzdem gelingt es ihr nicht, zur Ruhe zu kommen, und für ihren Sohn Jason entwickelt sich Jahre später ein Zufallsklick im Internet zu einer aufwühlende Suche nach einer Mutter, die er so nie kannte.
"Ein schillerndes Buch mit dem scharfen Stakkato einer Joan Didion und dem historischen Nachhall und der effektvollen Spache eines Don DeLillo. Ein symphonisches Porträt von drei Jahrzehnten amerikanischer Zeitgeschichte." (New York Times)
Die Autorin: Dana Spiotta wuchs in Kalifornien auf und lebt mit ihrem Mann und ihrer Tochter im Cherry Valley im Staat New York. Dort betreibt sie, wenn sie nicht gerade schreibt, im ersten Stock ihres Hauses ein Restaurant. Ihr Roman "Eat the Document" wurde 2006 für den National Book Award nominiert.
Was passiert, wenn das eigene Leben urplötzlich die Richtung wechselt? Wenn man von einem Tag auf den anderen seine Identität aufgeben, ein anderer werden muss? In den Siebzigerjahren muss Mary Whittaker nach einem missglückten Attentatsversuch untertauchen, sich neu erfinden in der scheinbaren Sicherheit einer bügerlichen Existenz. Aber so einfach lässt die Vergangenheit sich nicht verdrängen, vor allem dann nicht, wenn der eigene Sohn anfängt, Nachforschungen anzustellen. In ihrem hochspannenden politischen Roman spannt Dana Spiotta gekonnt einen Bogen von der amerikanischen Protestkultur der Siebzigerjahre zur Antiglobalisierungsbewegung der Neunziger und zeichnet einfühlsam das vielschichtige Porträt einer außergewöhnlichen Frau.

(Literaturkritik.de - Rezensionsforum / https://literaturkritik.de/public/rezension.php?rez_id/12874 / erschienen am 16.3.2009 / Rezensent: Thomas Neumann)
Wo ist Bob Dylan ? : über den vermeintlich politischen Roman "Eat the document. die perfekte Tarnung" von Dana Spiotta
Der Ausgangspunkt von Dana Spiottas Erzählung ist ein missglücktes Attentat auf das Haus eines Waffenfabrikanten. Bei einer Bombenexplosion kommt versehentlich eine Hausangestellte des Industriellen ums Leben. Die beiden verantwortlichen Attentäter Mary Whittaker und Bobby de Soto, ein angehender Filmemacher, entscheiden sich unterzutauchen. Das Paar trennt sich, gibt die eigenen Identitäten auf und versucht einen "Neuanfang" mit neuem Namen - jeweils an verschiedenen Orten und ohne weiteren Kontakt zueinander. Für Mary wie für Bobby beginnt eine abenteuerliche Reise mit verschiedenen Identitäten, mehreren Namenswechseln und die psychischen Probleme, die ein Leben auf der Flucht mit sich bringt. Das als politischer Roman angekündigte Buch von Dana Spiotta wartet zuerst einmal mit einem Inhaltsverzeichnis auf, das den Leser auf eine verschachtelte Erzählstruktur aufmerksam macht. Auffällig ist, dass dort der Eintrag "Jasons Tagebuch" wiederholt auftritt. Auf den zweiten Blick findet man eine Einteilung in Zeitabschnitte, die nicht chronologisch angeordnet sind. Die Chronologie der Ereignisse stellt sich dann bei der Lektüre nach und nach ein - ebenso wie sich die Verbindungen der Protagonisten für den Leser erst auf den letzten Seiten entschlüsseln. Die Handlung des Romans orientiert sich an der indirekten Hauptfigur Mary. Nach mehreren Zwischenstationen hat sie ein neues Leben und einen neuen Partner gefunden. Sie wird schwanger und bekommt einen Jungen namens Jason. Dieser ist der zweite Handlungsträger des Romans. Der Roman beginnt mit Jasons Interesse an der Vergangenheit seiner Mutter. Im Internet entdeckt er zufällig die ursprüngliche Identität seiner Mutter und beginnt mit Recherchen, die ihn zu dem Attentat und zu einer ihm bisher verborgenen Vergangenheit führen. Dabei schafft es Spiotta, die Entwicklung des Jugendlichen mit der Geschichte seiner Mutter zu synchronisieren, und man hat plötzlich eine eindringliche Schilderung einer Mutter-Sohn-Beziehung im Kontext von Pubertät und Adoleszenz vor sich. Hier drängt sich eine vermeintliche "Nebenhandlung" nicht zum Schaden des Romans in den Vordergrund. Interessanterweise benennt Spiotta den Roman nach dem als verschollen geltenden Dokumentarfilm "Eat the document" von und über Bob Dylans Großbritannien-Tour von 1966. Es war die Tour, auf der Dylan erstmals mit elektrischer Gitarre aufgetreten war, was für viele seiner Fans als Bruch mit der Tradition der Folkmusik aufgefasst wurde. Die Anlehnung an diese Geschichte der Rock- und Popmusik wird über die Betitelung hinaus thematisch von den Ausführungen zur Musikgeschichte und Popkultur in Jasons Tagebuch begleitet. Seien es die detaillierten Gedankenspiele über die Beach Boys, die Wilson Brüder und die Arbeit an ihrem Album "Pet Sounds" - oder zu den "P-Funk All Stars" und "Funkadelic" - sie zeugen von kompetenten Detailwissen. Es ist Jason, der seine Mutter mit ihrer Vergangenheit und seinen Recherchen dazu konfrontiert und dem die Erzählerin ein zusammenfassendes Schlußwort in den Mund legt. Jason entdeckt, dass sich mit seinen Erkenntnissen über seine Vergangenheit seine Gegenwart verändert, unter anderem sein Verhältnis zu seiner bisher innig geliebten Musik der "Beach Boys". Musik ist identitätsstiftend. Die vermeintliche Einschränkung wird aber in ein Moment der Befreiung verkehrt: für Jason ebenso wie für den Leser: "Erstens werde ich sie [meine LPs, CDs, Singles und auch EPs, T.N.] irgendwann so lange nicht gehört haben, dass sie mir wieder frisch und neu vorkommen. Vielleicht entsteht wieder eine Verbindung zwischen der Musik und mir, die sogar viel reifer sein könnte, weil ich älter und vermutlich selbst reifer geworden sein werde. Vielleicht fallen mir Dinge auf, die ich in jüngerem Alter nicht hören konnte. Vielleicht werde ich wieder genauso verzaubert, genauso begeistert und gefesselt sein. Vielleicht verliebe ich mich wieder ganz von Neuem. All das könnte passieren. Das ist doch möglich, oder?" Kurz: Ein intelligentes, unterhaltsames und lesenswertes, wenn auch in manchen Passagen ein etwas "umständliches" Buch.
  Aficionado | Jul 9, 2019 |
It's been a long time since a book really touched me. I want to make a pun about bombing my heart, but Eat the Document is way too subtle for that. I am so glad I read Stone Arabia before this because Stone Arabia book feels like a little offshoot of this one. Eat the Document has much more scope and accomplishes so much more. It does kind of feel like Spiotta is purging herself of all her thoughts about the American left. But at its bombed out heart Eat the Document is a love story between Mary and Bobby. Where to go from here? Please take your time Dana and write something better than Dissident Gardens.

I listened to the audio and the big reveal would have been wonderful if I didn't already know the plot. Rachael Warren does a great job shifting between decades and voices--not an easy job for a reader.

And there is a bunch of music snob fandom BS thrown in too and I love that. ( )
  librarianbryan | May 17, 2015 |
I don't know why I thought this was so soulless, but it wasn't enjoyable or satisfying, and if there were some way I could re-gift it, I probably would, because my shelves don't have space for something I'm not going to take off them. So to speak. ( )
  cricketbats | Apr 18, 2013 |
Well worth the read even though I'm not ranking it as a classic or anything. What happens when underground 60's radicals meet wannabe poseur radicals in the 2000's? Lots of thoughts on what it means to protest. ( )
  periwinklejane | Mar 31, 2013 |
Es mostren 1-5 de 16 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Sense ressenyes | afegeix-hi una ressenya
Has d'iniciar sessió per poder modificar les dades del coneixement compartit.
Si et cal més ajuda, mira la pàgina d'ajuda del coneixement compartit.
Títol normalitzat
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Títol original
Títols alternatius
Data original de publicació
Gent/Personatges
Llocs importants
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Esdeveniments importants
Pel·lícules relacionades
Premis i honors
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Epígraf
Dedicatòria
Primeres paraules
Citacions
Darreres paraules
Nota de desambiguació
Editor de l'editorial
Creadors de notes promocionals a la coberta
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Llengua original
CDD/SMD canònics

Referències a aquesta obra en fonts externes.

Wikipedia en anglès (1)

In the heyday of the 1970s underground, Bobby DeSoto and Mary Whittaker-passionate, idealistic, and in love-design a series of radical protests against the Vietnam War. When one action goes wrong, the course of their lives is forever changed. The two must erase their past, forge new identities, and never see each other again. Now it is the 1990s. Mary lives in the suburbs with her fifteen-year-old son, who spends hours immersed in the music of his mother's generation. She has no idea where Bobby is, whether he is alive or dead. Shifting between the protests in the 1970s and the consequences of those choices in the 1990s, Dana Spiotta deftly explores the connection between the two eras-their language, technology, music, and activism. Character-driven and brilliant, this is an important and revelatory novel about the culture of rebellion, with particular resonance now.

No s'han trobat descripcions de biblioteca.

Descripció del llibre
Sumari haiku

Dreceres

Cobertes populars

Valoració

Mitjana: (3.53)
0.5
1 2
1.5 2
2 10
2.5 3
3 30
3.5 11
4 45
4.5 2
5 14

Ets tu?

Fes-te Autor del LibraryThing.

 

Quant a | Contacte | LibraryThing.com | Privadesa/Condicions | Ajuda/PMF | Blog | Botiga | APIs | TinyCat | Biblioteques llegades | Crítics Matiners | Coneixement comú | 157,345,864 llibres! | Barra superior: Sempre visible