IniciGrupsConversesExploraTendències
Cerca al lloc
Aquest lloc utilitza galetes per a oferir els nostres serveis, millorar el desenvolupament, per a anàlisis i (si no has iniciat la sessió) per a publicitat. Utilitzant LibraryThing acceptes que has llegit i entès els nostres Termes de servei i política de privacitat. L'ús que facis del lloc i dels seus serveis està subjecte a aquestes polítiques i termes.
Hide this

Resultats de Google Books

Clica una miniatura per anar a Google Books.

The Lost Weekend de Charles Jackson
S'està carregant…

The Lost Weekend (1944 original; edició 2013)

de Charles Jackson (Autor)

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaMencions
443946,449 (4.03)24
The classic tale of one man's struggle with alcoholism, this revolutionary novel remains Charles Jackson's best-known book--a daring autobiographical work that paved the way for contemporary addiction literature. It is 1936, and on the East Side of Manhattan, a would-be writer named Don Birnam decides to have a drink. And then another, and then another, until he's in the midst of what becomes a five-day binge. The Lost Weekend moves with unstoppable speed, propelled by a heartbreaking but unflinching truth. It catapulted Charles Jackson to fame, and endures as an acute study of the ravages of alcoholism, as well as an unforgettable parable of the condition of the modern man.… (més)
Membre:benedictemohr
Títol:The Lost Weekend
Autors:Charles Jackson (Autor)
Informació:Vintage (2013), Edition: Reprint, 272 pages
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca
Valoració:
Etiquetes:Cap

Informació de l'obra

The Lost Weekend de Charles Jackson (1944)

S'està carregant…

Apunta't a LibraryThing per saber si aquest llibre et pot agradar.

No hi ha cap discussió a Converses sobre aquesta obra.

» Mira també 24 mencions

Es mostren 1-5 de 9 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Heavy book, there’s a lot going on, definitely need to reread ( )
  jimifenway | Jan 30, 2020 |
A bleak profile of an alcoholic, 'The Lost Weekend' is 5 or so days in the life of Don Birnam. It is implied, and later confirmed, that he'd only just recovered from a long drinking binge when his brother reluctantly leaves him alone for a long weekend.

Alcoholism is what this book is about, not just a 5 day bender in 1940s New York. As Don goes about begging, lying and stealing for more cash and more booze, his mind drifts back over his life and give details that provide reasons, or, given his cynicism, excuses for how his life's turned out.

Don is in turns charming, bitter, sentimental, self-pitying and, overwhelmingly depressed. The book is full of quotations from Shakespeare and quotations that he repeats to himself in alternating forms of comfort and condemnation. He knows everything that's going to happen, everything he's going to have to do, the moment he swipes the housekeeper's pay and runs to a bar.

There's very little in the way of the slang or patter that I've come to expect from the novels of the 1930s and 40s, but 'The Lost Weekend' is clearly set in a New York of the late depression, with the memory of prohibition still fresh. Very interesting as well were several references to the not-so-clandestine gay population and Don's own gray areas in that corner.

Don's mind is constantly on those he has let down, his brother Wick and girlfriend Helen in particular, but his mother, past girlfriends, numerous old friends and neighbors who he's alienated through his behavior while drinking, and money borrowed and never repaid until his brother's discovery of the debt. Several times he forgets the events of whole chapters as the book progresses and meets the consequences of those actions with confused resignation.

Maybe because of the insular nature of this book I had some trouble getting into it at first, but inevitably you're drawn into Don's mindset and have to see his crash through until the end. ( )
1 vota ManWithAnAgenda | Feb 18, 2019 |
https://nwhyte.livejournal.com/3089967.html

It’s as grim reading as the film is grim viewing, tight third throughout, vividly realised, and without the film’s happy ending.

Don Birnam is bisexual in the original novel, but firmly straight on screen; in the book, his ambiguous sexuality is part of the root of his addiction - which of course rather ignores the fact that in real life, many alcoholics are entirely secure in their sexual identities; but I guess Jackson had to tell the story he himself knew best.

The penultimate section of the book has Don hallucinating at his girlfriend Helen’s apartment, rather than his own - this gives a stronger sense of displacement, and of course reinforces the point that when he does get home he starts drinking again, ending the book in the same place he started, only worse off.

Several of the great visuals of the film (including the opera scene) were written for the screen and were not in the original book. The passage in the hospital is memorable in a very different way in the book - the nurse, Bim Nolan, hints at seducing Don as part of his treatment, though Don is not really interested either in being seduced or in being treated. (In fairness this is hinted at on screen, but it is text rather than subtext in the original.) ( )
  nwhyte | Sep 23, 2018 |
Well-written, eye-opening, Charles Jackson's The Lost Weekend is a very good book. However, I can't say I enjoyed reading it. I picked it up, put it down, until I finally made myself finish it today. It just isn't pleasant spending so much time inside the head of an alcoholic. ( )
  MelissaLenhardt | Mar 11, 2018 |
This extended internal monologue of a gay alcoholic loose on the streets of Manhattan was in very modern in many ways despite its 1936 setting. Jackson gets very deep into the erratic, diseased alcoholic logic; his depictions of hangovers and lust for alcohol are moving and at times comic. The passing characters are a mix of distinct portraits (e.g., Bim, the nurse in the drunk tank at the hospital) and weak caricatures (e.g., the hostess at the narrator's customary bar). Indeed, the female characters in particular suffer in depth relative to the males. But what ultimately doomed this work was its repetition and length; it desperately needed an editor. The interminable dream sequence on his last day was both unnecessary and distracting. ( )
  Bostonseanachie | Dec 14, 2016 |
Es mostren 1-5 de 9 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Sense ressenyes | afegeix-hi una ressenya

» Afegeix-hi altres autors (4 possibles)

Nom de l'autorCàrrecTipus d'autorObra?Estat
Charles Jacksonautor primaritotes les edicionscalculat
Eggink, ClaraTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Salter, StefanDissenyadorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Has d'iniciar sessió per poder modificar les dades del coneixement compartit.
Si et cal més ajuda, mira la pàgina d'ajuda del coneixement compartit.
Títol normalitzat
Títol original
Títols alternatius
Data original de publicació
Gent/Personatges
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Llocs importants
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Esdeveniments importants
Pel·lícules relacionades
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Premis i honors
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Epígraf
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
And can you, by no drift of circumstance,
Get from him why he puts on this confusion, 
Grading so harshly all his days of quiet
With turbulent and dangerous lunacy?
- HAMLET, III, I
Dedicatòria
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
TO
MY WIFE
Primeres paraules
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
'The barometer of his emotional nature was set for a spell of riot.'
Citacions
Darreres paraules
Nota de desambiguació
Editor de l'editorial
Creadors de notes promocionals a la coberta
Llengua original
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
CDD/SMD canònics
LCC canònic

Referències a aquesta obra en fonts externes.

Wikipedia en anglès

Cap

The classic tale of one man's struggle with alcoholism, this revolutionary novel remains Charles Jackson's best-known book--a daring autobiographical work that paved the way for contemporary addiction literature. It is 1936, and on the East Side of Manhattan, a would-be writer named Don Birnam decides to have a drink. And then another, and then another, until he's in the midst of what becomes a five-day binge. The Lost Weekend moves with unstoppable speed, propelled by a heartbreaking but unflinching truth. It catapulted Charles Jackson to fame, and endures as an acute study of the ravages of alcoholism, as well as an unforgettable parable of the condition of the modern man.

No s'han trobat descripcions de biblioteca.

Descripció del llibre
Sumari haiku

Cobertes populars

Dreceres

Valoració

Mitjana: (4.03)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2 3
2.5 1
3 9
3.5 7
4 29
4.5 8
5 21

Ets tu?

Fes-te Autor del LibraryThing.

 

Quant a | Contacte | LibraryThing.com | Privadesa/Condicions | Ajuda/PMF | Blog | Botiga | APIs | TinyCat | Biblioteques llegades | Crítics Matiners | Coneixement comú | 171,992,233 llibres! | Barra superior: Sempre visible