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Angels in the Architecture: A Protestant Vision for Middle Earth

de Douglas Jones

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279573,031 (4.04)No n'hi ha cap
Christianity presents a glorious vision of culture, a vision overflowing with truth, beauty, and goodness. It's a vision that stands in stark conflict with the anemic modern (and postmodern) perspectives that dominate contemporary life. Medieval Christianity began telling a beautiful story about the good life, but it was silenced in mid-sentence. The Reformation rescued truth, but its modern grandchildren have often ignored the importance of a medieval grasp of the good life. This book sketches a vision of "medieval Protestantism," a personal and cultural vision that embraces the fullness of Christian truth, beauty, and goodness. "This volume is a breath of fresh air in our polluted religious environment. Hopefully many readers will breathe deeply of its contents and be energized." -The Presbyterian Witness " A] delightful apologetic for a Protestant cultural vision. . . . before you write off these two as mere obscurantist Reformed types, take care. I found that some of my objections were, on the surface, more modern than biblical." -Gregory Alan Thornbury, Carl F. Henry Center for Christian Leadership " T]his book cries out against the bland, purely spiritualized Christianity to which so many of us have become accustomed. . . . I highly recommend it." -David Kind, Pilgrimage, Concordia Theological Seminary… (més)
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Es mostren totes 5
The authors of this book present an attractive vision of a world in which we revel in the goodness of God. I was drawn to their desire to live in a world where Christianity is assumed, where we understand that beauty comes from God and he wants us to feast on his gifts. It is hard to do this book justice in a short review, the vision soars beyond that. I particularly enjoyed their emphasis on having a poetic view of the world, and I think they must have applied it well as they tackled our need for high views of God, his church, hierarchies of authority, work, family, stories, our relationships, art and theology because I felt myself being carried to a place of greater understanding and appreciation for a full and contemplative view of reality.

I wish they had gone into a few more specifics, particularly on the federal understanding of marriage, and while I agreed with much of the concept they were attempting to communicate as they discussed Bible translation (church authority) I simply cannot stand with them on the AV translation for today nor the textus receptus. ( )
  deferredreward | Oct 27, 2012 |
I'm a big fan of many of Doug Wilson's books. Though I disagree with his FV positions, I think his books on the family are, hands down, the best books out there on the topic. That's why I'm so disappointed in Angels in the Architecture.

First the good - and there is some. Wilson is a very good writer, and even when I disagree with his point he makes it well (I don't have the same high praise for Jones). The theme of the book is an important one. Most Christians have false ideas about Medieval Christianity (as most also do with the Puritans). The idea of using Medieval thought and practice as a starting point for recovering a legitimate Christian aesthetic is appealing to me.

Christians have forgotten the importance of (and the joy found in) home-life, music, art, fiction, good meals, good wine, good sex, and even work. I applaud the author's aims to encourage us to think more critically about the right use of each of those gifts. In fact, the first five chapters are all valuable toward this end.

But, as Wilson tends to do sometimes, he and Jones take it all a bit too far. Joy and laughter aren't just one response to truth - they're the ones that demonstrate gratitude. The KJV isn't just an excellent English translation of the Scriptures, it's the only one English-speaking Christians should be allowed to use. Fiction isn't just good, it "transfers truth in a far more powerful way than anything else," and "parents who don't enjoy fiction must have some serious spiritual problem."

Chapter 11, on raising children, is seriously flawed in more ways than I can properly detail here. Chapter 12, on the intrinsic superiority of the rural to the urban, is utter nonsense and an exegetical nightmare.

I was looking for a good book on the topic referenced in the subtitle: "A Protestant Vision for Middle Earth." Unfortunately, I'm still looking. ( )
  PaulM | Aug 20, 2010 |
While the current trend in theology - particularly cut of the recent Anabaptist and/or emerging cloth - is to view Christendom and Constantine as evils of the highest order, Wilson and Jones make the case that modernism has bankrupted itself as well in its rejection of medieval virtues. Most importantly, they set out a vision of Christendom - the City of God - as one built upon the culmination of principles that were developed in the medieval period but were not given their fullest expression due to the eruption of the Enlightenment. These principles reveal a vision of "the good life" - one of celebration, beauty, goodness, and truth - built upon the reign of God. The medieval project was imperfect, according to Wilson and Jones, but it was They reject the notion that this City of God will be built by the sword, tyranny, and coercion (in this sense, they are closer to the Sattler/Simons Anabaptist vision than the current Anabaptists) . Rather, they see a reformation in worship and life of Christians - with a return to medieval virtues such as agrarian calm, poetic knowledge, celebration, rightly ordered hierarchies, anti-Statism, etc. - as the catalyst for the triumph of the City of God over the City of Man. One could consider this vision, from a political perspective, as a kind of traditionalist anarchism.This is a good introduction to a worldview that is entirely alien to our own. Whether we recognize it or not, we are programmed - though not incurably - to accept Enlightenment myths of the primacy of rationalism, of traditional knowledge as useless knowledge, and of progress as a virtue. I would quibble with aspects of Wilson and Jones argument, though these are mostly secondary and tertiary points. Overall, I enjoyed this book and would recommend it to those interested in exploring what Christendom could look like. ( )
1 vota devandecicco | Dec 28, 2009 |
While the current trend in theology - particularly cut of the recent Anabaptist and/or emerging cloth - is to view Christendom and Constantine as evils of the highest order, Wilson and Jones make the case that modernism has bankrupted itself as well in its rejection of medieval virtues. Most importantly, they set out a vision of Christendom - the City of God - as one built upon the culmination of principles that were developed in the medieval period but were not given their fullest expression due to the eruption of the Enlightenment. These principles reveal a vision of "the good life" - one of celebration, beauty, goodness, and truth - built upon the reign of God. The medieval project was imperfect, according to Wilson and Jones, but it was They reject the notion that this City of God will be built by the sword, tyranny, and coercion (in this sense, they are closer to the Sattler/Simons Anabaptist vision than the current Anabaptists) . Rather, they see a reformation in worship and life of Christians - with a return to medieval virtues such as agrarian calm, poetic knowledge, celebration, rightly ordered hierarchies, anti-Statism, etc. - as the catalyst for the triumph of the City of God over the City of Man. One could consider this vision, from a political perspective, as a kind of traditionalist anarchism.This is a good introduction to a worldview that is entirely alien to our own. Whether we recognize it or not, we are programmed - though not incurably - to accept Enlightenment myths of the primacy of rationalism, of traditional knowledge as useless knowledge, and of progress as a virtue. I would quibble with aspects of Wilson and Jones argument, though these are mostly secondary and tertiary points. Overall, I enjoyed this book and would recommend it to those interested in exploring what Christendom could look like. ( )
  devandecicco | Dec 28, 2009 |
A humdinger. A lifechanger. The big one that didn't get away. Read it. ( )
1 vota taterzngravy | Nov 26, 2006 |
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Christianity presents a glorious vision of culture, a vision overflowing with truth, beauty, and goodness. It's a vision that stands in stark conflict with the anemic modern (and postmodern) perspectives that dominate contemporary life. Medieval Christianity began telling a beautiful story about the good life, but it was silenced in mid-sentence. The Reformation rescued truth, but its modern grandchildren have often ignored the importance of a medieval grasp of the good life. This book sketches a vision of "medieval Protestantism," a personal and cultural vision that embraces the fullness of Christian truth, beauty, and goodness. "This volume is a breath of fresh air in our polluted religious environment. Hopefully many readers will breathe deeply of its contents and be energized." -The Presbyterian Witness " A] delightful apologetic for a Protestant cultural vision. . . . before you write off these two as mere obscurantist Reformed types, take care. I found that some of my objections were, on the surface, more modern than biblical." -Gregory Alan Thornbury, Carl F. Henry Center for Christian Leadership " T]his book cries out against the bland, purely spiritualized Christianity to which so many of us have become accustomed. . . . I highly recommend it." -David Kind, Pilgrimage, Concordia Theological Seminary

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