IniciGrupsConversesExploraTendències
Cerca al lloc
Aquest lloc utilitza galetes per a oferir els nostres serveis, millorar el desenvolupament, per a anàlisis i (si no has iniciat la sessió) per a publicitat. Utilitzant LibraryThing acceptes que has llegit i entès els nostres Termes de servei i política de privacitat. L'ús que facis del lloc i dels seus serveis està subjecte a aquestes polítiques i termes.
Hide this

Resultats de Google Books

Clica una miniatura per anar a Google Books.

Agnes's Jacket: A Psychologist's Search for…
S'està carregant…

Agnes's Jacket: A Psychologist's Search for the Meanings of Madness (2009 original; edició 2009)

de Gail Hornstein PhD (Autor)

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaConverses
831273,225 (4.21)Cap
In a Victorian-era German asylum, seamstress Agnes Richter painstakingly stitched a mysterious autobiographical text into every inch of the jacket she created from her institutional uniform. Despite every attempt to silence them, hundreds of other psychiatric patients have managed to get their stories out, or to publish them on their own. Today, in a vibrant network of peer-advocacy groups all over the world, those with firsthand experience of emotional distress are working together to unravel the mysteries of madness and to help one another recover. Agnes's Jacket tells their story, focusing especially on the Hearing Voices Network (HVN), an international collaboration of professionals, people with lived experience, and their families and friends who have been working to develop an alternative approach to coping with voices, visions, and other extreme states that is empowering and useful and does not start from the assumption that such people have a chronic illness. A vast gulf exists between the way medicine explains psychiatric conditions and the experiences of those who suffer. Hornstein's work helps us to bridge that gulf, guiding us through the inner lives of those diagnosed with schizophrenia, bipolar illness, depression, and paranoia, and emerging with nothing less than a new model for understanding one another and ourselves.… (més)
Membre:kevix
Títol:Agnes's Jacket: A Psychologist's Search for the Meanings of Madness
Autors:Gail Hornstein PhD (Autor)
Informació:Rodale Books (2009), 304 pages
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca
Valoració:
Etiquetes:to-read

Informació de l'obra

Agnes's Jacket: A Psychologist's Search for the Meanings of Madness de Gail Hornstein (2009)

Cap
S'està carregant…

Apunta't a LibraryThing per saber si aquest llibre et pot agradar.

No hi ha cap discussió a Converses sobre aquesta obra.

I found Agnes's Jacket to be a very uneven work. On one hand, I was very moved by the possibility that self-help groups can be a valuable resource. Hornstein spends time in England where the mentally ill are often considered by to be “experts by experience” able to assist one another and insist that the psychiatric professions truly listen to them about the nature of insanity. They exchange ideas on dealing with symptoms that they cannot get rid of; I would think that this might be limited to the higher functioning insane. Others might not be sufficiently articulate, but perhaps different types of groups could help different people.

Hornstein comments that people who hear voices can often help one another cope. That seems very plausible and promising to me. But surely one's underlying attitude toward the voices makes a difference: the person who genuinely believes that there is a radio transmitter in his/her head might not see how practicing yoga would be to the point. I would think that they would feel more in need of a surgeon to remove the transmitter. Still, if self-help is effective, I support it. At least they could be offered the support of people who understand and sympathize with their problems. Unlike Hornstein, I don't think it necessarily follows that there are not underlying chemical bases for some mental illnesses.

Hornstein also quotes an author know as John Custance who suffered from mental illness and wrote books on the subject. (She is very disappointed to find out that his son does not remember life with father fondly.) Custance argued that if a lunatic tells his doctor that he sees a devil, the doctor should regard the devil as being as actual as the lunatic and investigate what kind of devil he has seen. Certainly talking to the lunatic about an imaginary devil may reveal more about the patient's mind, but if the devil is actual, than the lunatic is wasting his time seeing a psychprofessional—he/she should be seeing an exorcist.

I am also not convinced by Hornstein's rejection of insanity, or some of it, as chemical imbalances. If, as she says, professional opinion shifts every forty years or so, I would assume that neither physical nor life history explanations are adequate. It may be that insanity, like blindness, can have a variety of sources and histories. Not all of her examples support her premise. “Peter, from Jesus”, for example, had not history of known traumas underlying his sudden breakdown, and found talk therapy irrelevant. If one has read popular works (and I would presume professional literature) about mental illness, one has also read about people who found talk therapy useless and drugs like Prozac a miracle cure, so perhaps the message is that there aren't simple answers. Mental patients, like all patients, need to be listened to. Agnes's jacket, the central symbol of the book, is ambiguous in this regard. It may be a statement from Agnes's point of view, but it is incomprehensible to the rest of the world, even to those who try earnestly to understand it.

Hornstein rejects the chemical imbalance theory because she does not like the assumption that the imbalance is incurable, although it can be treated. It doesn't matter what she doesn't like, it matters what it true. She does not offer any evidence that her preferred support groups cure the condition, and it is ironic that such groups, especially those in the twelve step tradition, has also been severely criticized for arguing that the problem will be life-long.

She also criticizes the chemical treatments because there are problems with side effects. That is very true, and not inconsequential, but it is also true with diseases that are generally agreed to be physical. I stopped taking the medicine I was given for migraines because I hated the side effects, but other people successfully use the same medicine. It really isn't evidence against the chemical imbalance theory, just against carelessness in the use of medication.

On the balance, self-help and guidance from mental patients sounds like it might be promising, but I am not convinced that insanity may not be, in some cases, chemical, and that drugs cannot be helpful. ( )
1 vota PuddinTame | Jul 26, 2009 |
Sense ressenyes | afegeix-hi una ressenya
Has d'iniciar sessió per poder modificar les dades del coneixement compartit.
Si et cal més ajuda, mira la pàgina d'ajuda del coneixement compartit.
Títol normalitzat
Títol original
Títols alternatius
Data original de publicació
Gent/Personatges
Llocs importants
Esdeveniments importants
Pel·lícules relacionades
Premis i honors
Epígraf
Dedicatòria
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
In Memory of Ellen Keniston
Primeres paraules
Citacions
Darreres paraules
Nota de desambiguació
Editor de l'editorial
Creadors de notes promocionals a la coberta
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Llengua original
CDD/SMD canònics
LCC canònic

Referències a aquesta obra en fonts externes.

Wikipedia en anglès

Cap

In a Victorian-era German asylum, seamstress Agnes Richter painstakingly stitched a mysterious autobiographical text into every inch of the jacket she created from her institutional uniform. Despite every attempt to silence them, hundreds of other psychiatric patients have managed to get their stories out, or to publish them on their own. Today, in a vibrant network of peer-advocacy groups all over the world, those with firsthand experience of emotional distress are working together to unravel the mysteries of madness and to help one another recover. Agnes's Jacket tells their story, focusing especially on the Hearing Voices Network (HVN), an international collaboration of professionals, people with lived experience, and their families and friends who have been working to develop an alternative approach to coping with voices, visions, and other extreme states that is empowering and useful and does not start from the assumption that such people have a chronic illness. A vast gulf exists between the way medicine explains psychiatric conditions and the experiences of those who suffer. Hornstein's work helps us to bridge that gulf, guiding us through the inner lives of those diagnosed with schizophrenia, bipolar illness, depression, and paranoia, and emerging with nothing less than a new model for understanding one another and ourselves.

No s'han trobat descripcions de biblioteca.

Descripció del llibre
Sumari haiku

Cobertes populars

Dreceres

Valoració

Mitjana: (4.21)
0.5
1
1.5
2 1
2.5
3
3.5 1
4 1
4.5
5 4

Ets tu?

Fes-te Autor del LibraryThing.

 

Quant a | Contacte | LibraryThing.com | Privadesa/Condicions | Ajuda/PMF | Blog | Botiga | APIs | TinyCat | Biblioteques llegades | Crítics Matiners | Coneixement comú | 171,501,836 llibres! | Barra superior: Sempre visible