IniciGrupsConversesMésTendències
Cerca al lloc
Aquest lloc utilitza galetes per a oferir els nostres serveis, millorar el desenvolupament, per a anàlisis i (si no has iniciat la sessió) per a publicitat. Utilitzant LibraryThing acceptes que has llegit i entès els nostres Termes de servei i política de privacitat. L'ús que facis del lloc i dels seus serveis està subjecte a aquestes polítiques i termes.
Hide this

Resultats de Google Books

Clica una miniatura per anar a Google Books.

Warday de Whitley Strieber
S'està carregant…

Warday (edició 1985)

de Whitley Strieber (Autor)

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaMencions
694724,774 (3.67)9
The unthinkable happened five years ago and now two writers have set out to find what's left of America. New York, Washington D.C., San Antonio, and parts of the Central and Western states are gone, and famine, epidemics, border wars and radiation diseases have devastated the countryside in between. It was a "limited" nuclear war, just a 36-minute exchange of missiles that abruptly ended when the superpowers' communication systems broke down. But Warday destroyed much of civilization. Whitley Strieber and James Kunetka, old friends and writers, take a dangerous odyssey across the former United States, sometimes hopeful that a new, peaceful world can be built over the old, sometimes despairing over the immense losses and embittered people they meet. In an eerie blend of fact and imagination, Strieber (author of "The Wolfen" and "The Hunger") and Kunetka (author of "City of Fire: Los Alamos and The Atomic Age," "1943-1945" and "Oppenheimer: The Years of Risk") cut through the doublespeak of military bureaucracy and the rhetoric of the 1980's peace movement to portray America after Warday.… (més)
Membre:kstahl10
Títol:Warday
Autors:Whitley Strieber (Autor)
Informació:Not Avail (1985), 515 pages
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca
Valoració:
Etiquetes:No n'hi ha cap

Detalls de l'obra

Warday de Whitley Strieber (Author)

  1. 00
    World War Z de Max Brooks (jseger9000)
    jseger9000: Both books use the device of survivor's stories to describe an apocalyptic event and the aftermath.
S'està carregant…

Apunta't a LibraryThing per saber si aquest llibre et pot agradar.

No hi ha cap discussió a Converses sobre aquesta obra.

» Mira també 9 mencions

Es mostren 1-5 de 7 (següent | mostra-les totes)
This is probably the best of the "Cold War goes hot" nuclear apocalypse stories. The "a bunch of stories from the perspective of the narrator, a reporter, interviewing people" worked well. Good audiobook quality as well. ( )
  octal | Jan 1, 2021 |
War Day is a post nuclear apocalypse written in the early 1980’s that I found strangely relevant in 2015. The premise of War Day is that there has been a nuclear war between the United States and the USSR (remember 1980’s). What is different about this war is it was very limited. Only a few areas of the USA are actually hit. No countries have nuclear hits other than the USA or USSR. Every country though feels the political and economic balance change drastically.

The two main characters, who are not fictional but place themselves in a fictional world, visit the different areas of the country. It contrasts the destitution and need of the areas that were close to the strikes with the areas that essential had no physical effects, no radiation at all. The story is told alternating between the main characters and the people they interview to assess the state of the union five years after War Day.

I read the book when it first came out. I bought the hard back, which four moves later is no longer in my library. I am very much a cold war child and have always been drawn to apocalyptic literature, especially post nuclear. Reading it before the collapse of the USSR and as a 24 year old, it was a great story. Reading it now in a post USSR world as a 52 year old is completely different. The difference comes down to the one “post” I haven’t mentioned: we live in a post 911 world.

I started reading the book simply because I remembered it as a good one and had an opportunity to review the audio version (This audiobook was provided by the author, narrator, or publisher at no cost in exchange for an unbiased review.). As I was reading the book again in 2015 I found parallels to how we as a nation have changed. When the areas unaffected by War Day are discussed, the issue of individual rights vs public protection become very prominent. It really was fascinating to see how the authors saw their fictional world facing limiting personal rights and freedoms to protect what the government perceived as the greater good.

The audio narration is excellent. Mr. Pierce has a very nice voice. He speaks clearly and communicates the emotions the authors created. His narration is a performance. It does not sound as though he is just reading it. It sounds like he studied the book. learned its secrets and then passed them on to the listener. It really is a very good narration. I would definitely listen to another book narrated by Mr. Pierce. I would recommend War Day especially the audio book narrated by Mr. Pierce.
( )
  nhalliwell | Nov 13, 2016 |
Superb post-apocalyptic novel about two writers who decide to tour the country five years after a limited nuclear exchange. Their own writings form the basis for the story line, punctuated throughout by ""interviews" with individuals in which they are simply allowed to say what they want to about their experiences related to the war and its aftermath. Among the people interviewed are politicians, a cab driver, a man who was on the plane with the president when the buttons were pushed, a school teacher, a midwife, a child, and many more--they related what it was like for them when the war happened and how they have changed and coped since. Finally, the narrative is peppered throughout with official "documents" describing the official government response to events. The overall effect is both realistic (both authors use their real names and there are other real people in the book) and intensely personal. I found two of the accounts--the simple day to day life of a child and the author's experience of returning to his NYC apartment to be almost unbearably moving. I've read many of these books since I first came across ""Alas Babylon" in high school, and I would have to rank this one among the very best I've read. Liked it enough to locate and acquire a signed copy. ( )
  unclebob53703 | Oct 24, 2016 |
Two journalists take a working road-trip, Studs Terkel style, across post-nuclear-war America.

From "Interview - Terry Burford, Midwife and Witch":

"I'm working toward delivering a baby a day. Right now I do about three or four a week. At the moment I've got fifty-eight patients in the midwifery and about two hundred in my general practice. I've got thirty psychiatric patients divided into four groups...." pg. 385

"... and then it's time to meet one of my psychotherapy groups. Since Warday the number of people in therapy has dropped by more than half. I think most of us work so hard we don't have time to be crazy. And nobody in this group is actually insane, not in the classic sense. There are ten members, five of them with touch neurosis, which is one of the more common current problems. There are many people who have developed a pathological terror of touching things because of the threat of hidden radiation. Two of my male patients suffer from impotence. Again, fear is a strong factor here. I have two women who have recently discovered they are gene-damaged, and one who is trying to cope with being triaged [denied health care by relief organizations because the person's life-time exposure to radiation guarantees death within 5 years] at the age of twenty-six, as a result of drinking strontium 90 in some milk she got last year in Dallas. Everybody is scared of milk because of the way cows concentrate strontium 90, but it has become a vitally important food. Milk, eggs, dairy products, soybeans, corn, and oats are our staples nowadays. Some chicken, but eggs are now too important to justify the slaughter of potential layers.
"....
"Most of the people in the afternoon group suffer from lack of good nutrition as much as anything else. People in therapy also tend to be the rigid personalities. This is an era of extreme change, and these are people who are afraid of change. Deep panic reactions are common. Most of them have very vivid memories of prewar times, and they are clinging to them. In better-adjusted people, prewar memories are always kind of hazy." pp. 391-2

From "The Dream Bandidos" when one of the journalists is taken hostage by an outlaw band of Destructuralist terrorists:
"'We have a vision,' the girl said, 'of a true Jeffersonian society in America. This could be a nation of farmers, where everybody is self-sufficient and God-fearing, and the family is the center of things.'....
"A man put his hand on her shoulder. She turned and kissed him in what seemed to me a private way. 'We all lost people,' he said. 'That's why we come together. This is a family.'
"Another voice was raised. 'If you're writers, write that another world like the world we had before Warday is going to mean another war. We have to change. We have to turn aside from the hypnosis of politics and the addiction of vast economic systems that eat this beautiful planet and spit out garbage. We need to turn to one another instead. What counts is the person in bed beside you, and your children, and the people next door....'
"My impulse was to try to comfort them, to make all the horror and the suffering of the past few years go away. But I couldn't do that. All I could do was eat their poor meal and look across their fire at them.
"....
"I could see something more than violence and rage in these people. They weren't just inept terrorists or starving road people or fanatics. They had their wounds too, like all of us. And because of that, I could make a case for tolerance and understanding.
"As soon as night fell, the camp went to sleep. As we have all found out, it takes a high level of nutrition and lots of artificial light to keep human beings awake after sunset. They were still like the rest of us were during the famine - dead to the world as soon as the sun went down." pp. 148-151
  Mary_Overton | Dec 26, 2012 |
1900 Warday and the Journey Beyond, by Whitley Strieber and James W. Kunetka (read 7 Jan 1985) My nephew said this was the best book he read in 1984, so I have now read it. It tells of events after 28 Oct 1988, when the U.S. and the USSR engage in a limited 20-minute nuclear war. Washington is destroyed, as is San Antonio and New York. It is a horrendous, extremely disquieting story--even though it is amateurish and in some ways inconsistent. New York after five years has only 7000 people and green vegetation is taking over! After reading this, I cannot be against ban-the-bomb and nuclear freeze people. I wish U.S. and Soviet leaders would read the book--though since it is all fiction they no doubt won't bother. But one can't help but think Russia isn't as bad as a devastated world. ( )
  Schmerguls | Sep 5, 2008 |
Es mostren 1-5 de 7 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Sense ressenyes | afegeix-hi una ressenya

» Afegeix-hi altres autors (4 possibles)

Nom de l'autorCàrrecTipus d'autorObra?Estat
Strieber, WhitleyAutorautor primaritotes les edicionsconfirmat
Kunetka, James W.autor principaltotes les edicionsconfirmat
Kunetka, James W.Autorautor principaltotes les edicionsconfirmat
Mörling, MikaelTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Penttilä, AriTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Has d'iniciar sessió per poder modificar les dades del coneixement compartit.
Si et cal més ajuda, mira la pàgina d'ajuda del coneixement compartit.
Títol normalitzat
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Títol original
Títols alternatius
Data original de publicació
Gent/Personatges
Llocs importants
Esdeveniments importants
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Pel·lícules relacionades
Premis i honors
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Epígraf
Dedicatòria
Primeres paraules
Citacions
Darreres paraules
Nota de desambiguació
Editor de l'editorial
Creadors de notes promocionals a la coberta
Llengua original
CDD/SMD canònics

Referències a aquesta obra en fonts externes.

Wikipedia en anglès (3)

The unthinkable happened five years ago and now two writers have set out to find what's left of America. New York, Washington D.C., San Antonio, and parts of the Central and Western states are gone, and famine, epidemics, border wars and radiation diseases have devastated the countryside in between. It was a "limited" nuclear war, just a 36-minute exchange of missiles that abruptly ended when the superpowers' communication systems broke down. But Warday destroyed much of civilization. Whitley Strieber and James Kunetka, old friends and writers, take a dangerous odyssey across the former United States, sometimes hopeful that a new, peaceful world can be built over the old, sometimes despairing over the immense losses and embittered people they meet. In an eerie blend of fact and imagination, Strieber (author of "The Wolfen" and "The Hunger") and Kunetka (author of "City of Fire: Los Alamos and The Atomic Age," "1943-1945" and "Oppenheimer: The Years of Risk") cut through the doublespeak of military bureaucracy and the rhetoric of the 1980's peace movement to portray America after Warday.

No s'han trobat descripcions de biblioteca.

Descripció del llibre
Sumari haiku

Dreceres

Cobertes populars

Valoració

Mitjana: (3.67)
0.5
1 3
1.5 1
2 9
2.5 2
3 32
3.5 8
4 37
4.5 5
5 26

Ets tu?

Fes-te Autor del LibraryThing.

 

Quant a | Contacte | LibraryThing.com | Privadesa/Condicions | Ajuda/PMF | Blog | Botiga | APIs | TinyCat | Biblioteques llegades | Crítics Matiners | Coneixement comú | 160,389,703 llibres! | Barra superior: Sempre visible