IniciGrupsConversesExploraTendències
Cerca al lloc
Has donat un cop d'ull al SantaThing, la tradició de fer-se regals de LibraryThing?
ignora
Aquest lloc utilitza galetes per a oferir els nostres serveis, millorar el desenvolupament, per a anàlisis i (si no has iniciat la sessió) per a publicitat. Utilitzant LibraryThing acceptes que has llegit i entès els nostres Termes de servei i política de privacitat. L'ús que facis del lloc i dels seus serveis està subjecte a aquestes polítiques i termes.
Hide this

Resultats de Google Books

Clica una miniatura per anar a Google Books.

S'està carregant…

Fedó

de Plato

Altres autors: Mira la secció altres autors.

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaMencions
1,3841210,385 (3.86)21
The Phaedo is acknowledged to be one of Plato's masterpieces, showing him both as a philosopher and as a dramatist at the height of his powers. For its moving account of the execution of Socrates, the Phaedo ranks among the supreme literary achievements of antiquity. It is also a documentcrucial to the understanding of many ideas deeply ingrained in western culture, and provides one of the best introductions to Plato's thought. This new edition is eminently suitable for readers new to Plato, offering a readable translation which is accessible without the aid of a commentary andassumes no prior knowledge of the ancient Greek world or language.… (més)
S'està carregant…

Apunta't a LibraryThing per saber si aquest llibre et pot agradar.

No hi ha cap discussió a Converses sobre aquesta obra.

» Mira també 21 mencions

Es mostren 1-5 de 12 (següent | mostra-les totes)
We continue our journey with Socrates to the moments before and of his death, as retold by Phaedo. This is an example of one of Plato's "Socratic" dialogues--it seems that Socrates and his fateful occasion are a convenient catalyst for Plato's idea of Forms and the Soul. To kick it off, Socrates tosses out the window his earlier denunciation of those who claim to know something of death (as recounted in the [b:Crito|780072|Crito|Plato|https://images.gr-assets.com/books/1348233590s/780072.jpg|6315175]): "...it is perhaps most appropriate for one who is about to depart yonder to tell and examine tales about what we believe the journey to be like" (53). From here we moved into a discussion of the body being a constraint on our ability to know thing in themselves (skepticism concerning sense perception); the soul's ability to know things in themselves; learning as recollection (detailed also in the [b:Meno|846122|Meno|Plato|https://images.gr-assets.com/books/1415425069s/846122.jpg|140111]); why a philosopher should not fear death (teaser: death is what all philosophers strive for); and then a meaty discussion on the immortality of the soul, which is full of convenient analogies and an omission of states in addition to properties. There's also a nice little huh? moment: "He [Socrates] stroked my [Phaedo's] head and pressed the hair on the bask of my neck, for he was in the habit of playing with my hair at times" (77). ( )
  chrisvia | Apr 29, 2021 |
The lovers of learning know that when philosophy gets hold of their soul, it is imprisoned in and clinging to the body, and that it is forced to examine other things through it as through a cage and not by itself, and that it wallows in every kind of ignorance. Philosophy sees that the worst feature of this imprisonment is that it is due to desires, so that the prisoner himself is contributing to his own incarceration most of all. [...] Philosophy then persuades the soul to withdraw from the senses in so far as it is not compelled to use them and bids the soul to gather itself together by itself, to trust only itself and whatever reality, existing by itself, the soul by itself understands, and not to consider as true whatever it examines by other means, for this is different in different circumstances and is sensible and visible, whereas what the soul itself sees is intelligible and invisible. The soul of the true philosopher thinks that this deliverance must not be opposed and so keeps away from pleasures and desires and pains as far as he can.

Some beautiful writing and hopeful arguments in the face of death, but not a wholly convincing justification for believing in the immortality of the soul. The theory of Forms gets a full treatment here for anyone looking to learn more about Plato's metaphysics. And one can't help but feeling a little twinge of melancholy mixed with admiration when Socrates blithely drinks the hemlock and tells everyone to stop their crying, by Zeus! ( )
  drbrand | Jun 8, 2020 |
Librería 6. Estante 3.
  atman2019 | Dec 16, 2019 |
FEDON

Fedón de Elis, discípulo de Sócrates, se encuentra con el pitagórico Equécrates de Fliunte, probablemente en la patria de este último.

Allí le narra lo sucedido las últimas horas de vida de Sócrates( este, el último día de su vida, reflexiona sobre la inmortalidad del alma, la moral, la reencarnación, la teoría de la reminiscencia y la generación de las ideas) y lo que se habló en esa ocasión.

Esto le permite a Platón disponer de un narrador que pueda presentar al lector no solo el diálogo mismo, sino también la escena y las acciones de los protagonistas. El diálogo narrado por Fedón tiene lugar en la prisión donde Sócrates estaba detenido esperando el momento de su ejecución, en Atenas, en el año 399 a. C. Aunque en la escena están presentes su esposa Jantipa (luego se retira y reaparece al final) y catorce de sus amigos -entre los que se encontraban Antístenes, Euclides y Critón (59b)-, los interlocutores principales de Sócrates son Simmias y Cebes, antiguos discípulos del pitagórico Filolao.
  FundacionRosacruz | Apr 6, 2018 |
The introduction to this one seems related to the text only in that they're both on the same subject; it's not introducing Plato as much as it's lining up a more modern set of questions about the soul and immortality. Which is fine, as far as it goes, but it goes...all over the place. (Either that or it's trying to apologize that Plato isn't Christian; I'm not entirely sure which.)

But Plato isn't at all Christian, as is clear by the very first discussion of death being a *leaving* of the gods, rather than a going to join them. Or the cyclical nature of life and death, or the suggestion (even though rejected) that the body might sometimes outlive the soul. This is the kind of thing that's fascinating even if you disagree with it in every particular, simply because it's so *different* - and yet similar, too, in the places where Plato was used by the medieval theologians.

There's a really interesting idea to be picked out if you combine Socrates's argument about knowledge already had at birth implying the persistence of the soul and what we now know about instincts and biology (plus a rejection of Cartesian Dualism), but I don't know if anyone's done that yet. ( )
  jen.e.moore | Dec 17, 2016 |
Es mostren 1-5 de 12 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Sense ressenyes | afegeix-hi una ressenya

» Afegeix-hi altres autors (136 possibles)

Nom de l'autorCàrrecTipus d'autorObra?Estat
PlatoAutorautor primaritotes les edicionsconfirmat
靖夫, 岩田翻訳autor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Fabrini, PierangioloTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Gallop, DavidTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Herwerden, Henricus vanTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Lami, AlessandroIntroduccióautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Molegraaf, MarioTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Oldewelt, H.Editorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Rouse, W.H.D.Traductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Schleiermacher, FriedrichTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
Warren, HansTraductorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat

Contingut a

Abreujat a

Té un estudi

Té una guia d'estudi per a estudiants

Has d'iniciar sessió per poder modificar les dades del coneixement compartit.
Si et cal més ajuda, mira la pàgina d'ajuda del coneixement compartit.
Títol normalitzat
Informació del coneixement compartit en alemany. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Títol original
Títols alternatius
Data original de publicació
Gent/Personatges
Informació del coneixement compartit en alemany. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Llocs importants
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Esdeveniments importants
Pel·lícules relacionades
Premis i honors
Informació del coneixement compartit en rus. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Epígraf
Dedicatòria
Primeres paraules
Informació del coneixement compartit en alemany. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Die Personen des Dialogs: Echekrates, Phaidon.
Ort: Phleius (im Nordosten der Peleponnes), kurz nach dem Tode Sokrates.

Echekrates: Phaidon, warst du selbst bei Sokrates an jenem Tage, als er das Gift trank im Gefängnis, oder hast du es von einem anderen gehört?
Echekrates: Warst du selbst, Phaidon, beim Sokrates an jenem Tage, als er im Gefängnis den Giftbecher trank, oder hast du von einem anderen darüber gehört? (neu durchgesehene Übersetzung von Friedrich Schleiermacher)
Citacions
Darreres paraules
Informació del coneixement compartit en alemany. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
(Clica-hi per mostrar-ho. Compte: pot anticipar-te quin és el desenllaç de l'obra.)
Nota de desambiguació
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Please separate and combine only LT works having substantially the same content. For example, this LT work includes one of Plato's dialogues: Phaedo. Thank you.

Phaedo and Phaedrus are two separate works by Plato.
Editor de l'editorial
Creadors de notes promocionals a la coberta
Llengua original
Informació del coneixement compartit en alemany. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
CDD/SMD canònics
LCC canònic

Referències a aquesta obra en fonts externes.

Wikipedia en anglès

No n'hi ha cap

The Phaedo is acknowledged to be one of Plato's masterpieces, showing him both as a philosopher and as a dramatist at the height of his powers. For its moving account of the execution of Socrates, the Phaedo ranks among the supreme literary achievements of antiquity. It is also a documentcrucial to the understanding of many ideas deeply ingrained in western culture, and provides one of the best introductions to Plato's thought. This new edition is eminently suitable for readers new to Plato, offering a readable translation which is accessible without the aid of a commentary andassumes no prior knowledge of the ancient Greek world or language.

No s'han trobat descripcions de biblioteca.

Descripció del llibre
Sumari haiku

Cobertes populars

Dreceres

Valoració

Mitjana: (3.86)
0.5
1 2
1.5
2 7
2.5 1
3 32
3.5 11
4 49
4.5 3
5 38

Ets tu?

Fes-te Autor del LibraryThing.

 

Quant a | Contacte | LibraryThing.com | Privadesa/Condicions | Ajuda/PMF | Blog | Botiga | APIs | TinyCat | Biblioteques llegades | Crítics Matiners | Coneixement comú | 164,336,375 llibres! | Barra superior: Sempre visible