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The War of the Worlds (Classic Starts®…
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The War of the Worlds (Classic Starts® Series) (edició 2007)

de H. G. Wells (Autor)

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An abridged version of H. G. Wells' classic science fiction tale in which, as life on Mars becomes impossible, Martians and their terrifying machines invade the Earth.
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Es mostren totes 5
*SPOILERS* This book starts with a man in his study. A weird cylinder falls from the sky and makes a crater in the ground. Everyone gathers around it and stares in fear and confusion. The cylinder starts unscrewing and some weird squid like creatures with two sets of eight tentacles plus big dark eyes and a beak like mouth come out. Everyone freaks out and some run. The British army comes in to destroy them, but they have a shield and a heat ray which kills most everyone. The man goes for his daily walk and he sees a Martian machine. It looked like a sphere with three legs and a heat ray. It went a long using its heat ray. The man went to London to meet his brother and get away. The Martians come and start using their heat ray. The British army uses their artillery but nothing is having an effect. One shot hits a Martian machine and it topples over and crashes. The other Martians get angry and go on a rampage. The man meets a curate, and they go to a house. The curate is very negative and just eats food. The curate is captured by the Martians and is probably killed. The man goes to dead London to find dead Martians. Bacteria killed the most advanced threat to the world.
I loved this book, I will read more H. G. Wells as well as other science fiction writers in the future. It was never boring, I finished the book in three days; it was that interesting. It kept me involved and wondering what the Martians were planing. I loved when Wells told us that an advance species had fallen to the smallest life on the planet. I like how some of the things he mentioned we still wonder about today. I like the way that he made it so easy to visualize in you brain. I thought I was watching a movie at some bits. If you or a friend like science fiction and doesn't mind a little violence, then you or them should read this book. ( )
  AndrewH.B4 | Feb 1, 2018 |
First Impressions:

An unusual falling star -- a puff of green smoke-something on the planet Mars -- and the world turns and goes about its business, unknowing in its complacency as the cold, calculating Martians and their machines make their first drive on the planet Earth.

Plots/Story:

It's interesting that I've never actually read H.G. Well's War of the Worlds! I've watched two films and listened to Orson Welles' radio show and thought I had the story down. Yes, but only in a general way.

The plot at times runs slow and I'm sure that's the Victorian era style of writing that this modern reader was having some hard time with, so I won't criticize the novel for its style. I will say though that the story is frightening and more likely a horror story that has various themes.

Themes:

The themes of people going crazy in the face of an unstoppable enemy is frightening in its accuracy. I've seen this in other science fiction stories as well: people have their foundations for their lives knocked out from under them and so have no problem with killing each other for food, for property and even cannibalism.

Wells makes some comment on how the people of his generation marry for convenience or money, get a trophy wife and go about their business not really living life. He makes this point several times.

Another theme is against an ironclad belief in religion to such a degree that you give up all your self-confidence and realism, shout that God is punishing you and give up and die. This idea was abhorrent to H.G., apparently. The journalist's run-in with the priest (the "curate" actually) was an interesting tale in desperation as each fought to the other, animalistically, and yet were completely motivated by fear.

Other Aspects:

The book shifts to the journalist's brother, whose tale of a fallen London is quite epic. The only problem with this part of the book was that it's unclear how the brother got to the journalist-narrator to get his story in the first place!

Future Inventions: Use of the idea of flight, the heat ray to burn down anything and everything, the unscratchable Martian armor, and the poison black smoke that kills all it comes in contact with, was a fascinating look into the future, some of it fairly accurate.

Another fun thing at the end had the apparent hint of a Mars/Venus altercation. Too bad he didn't write a sequel on that one!

Books to Media:

The 1953 version of War of the Worlds is my favorite adaptation. It kept the idea of a journalist and the heat ray. The unstoppable Martians could not even be stopped by an atom bomb!

The Tom Cruise version kept the idea of the baskets and how the Martian machines would scoop people up into these baskets -- the book explains for food and keeping more humans for breeding and food purposes.

And of course the Halloween treat by Orson Welles' radio show of 1938 which clearly put his face out there and where he enjoyed some fame as a twenty-something producer as he formed an invasion of New Jersey. Wow!

Bottom Line:

A classic in many respects, The War of the Worlds is a narrative that criticizes in science fiction form the attitudes and strict Victorian society of the time as well as contemplates Man's reactions to an apparent extermination of the species. Will we have men like the artilleryman, who dreams of a society of supermen who will some day bring down the Martians, or the curate, who would give up and die under the foot of the Martian march across the Continent?

Or will a simple sneeze wipe out a whole invasion force?

Highly recommended!



( )
  James_Mourgos | Dec 22, 2016 |
First Impressions:

An unusual falling star -- a puff of green smoke-something on the planet Mars -- and the world turns and goes about its business, unknowing in its complacency as the cold, calculating Martians and their machines make their first drive on the planet Earth.

Plots/Story:

It's interesting that I've never actually read H.G. Well's War of the Worlds! I've watched two films and listened to Orson Welles' radio show and thought I had the story down. Yes, but only in a general way.

The plot at times runs slow and I'm sure that's the Victorian era style of writing that this modern reader was having some hard time with, so I won't criticize the novel for its style. I will say though that the story is frightening and more likely a horror story that has various themes.

Themes:

The themes of people going crazy in the face of an unstoppable enemy is frightening in its accuracy. I've seen this in other science fiction stories as well: people have their foundations for their lives knocked out from under them and so have no problem with killing each other for food, for property and even cannibalism.

Wells makes some comment on how the people of his generation marry for convenience or money, get a trophy wife and go about their business not really living life. He makes this point several times.

Another theme is against an ironclad belief in religion to such a degree that you give up all your self-confidence and realism, shout that God is punishing you and give up and die. This idea was abhorrent to H.G., apparently. The journalist's run-in with the priest (the "curate" actually) was an interesting tale in desperation as each fought to the other, animalistically, and yet were completely motivated by fear.

Other Aspects:

The book shifts to the journalist's brother, whose tale of a fallen London is quite epic. The only problem with this part of the book was that it's unclear how the brother got to the journalist-narrator to get his story in the first place!

Future Inventions: Use of the idea of flight, the heat ray to burn down anything and everything, the unscratchable Martian armor, and the poison black smoke that kills all it comes in contact with, was a fascinating look into the future, some of it fairly accurate.

Another fun thing at the end had the apparent hint of a Mars/Venus altercation. Too bad he didn't write a sequel on that one!

Books to Media:

The 1953 version of War of the Worlds is my favorite adaptation. It kept the idea of a journalist and the heat ray. The unstoppable Martians could not even be stopped by an atom bomb!

The Tom Cruise version kept the idea of the baskets and how the Martian machines would scoop people up into these baskets -- the book explains for food and keeping more humans for breeding and food purposes.

And of course the Halloween treat by Orson Welles' radio show of 1938 which clearly put his face out there and where he enjoyed some fame as a twenty-something producer as he formed an invasion of New Jersey. Wow!

Bottom Line:

A classic in many respects, The War of the Worlds is a narrative that criticizes in science fiction form the attitudes and strict Victorian society of the time as well as contemplates Man's reactions to an apparent extermination of the species. Will we have men like the artilleryman, who dreams of a society of supermen who will some day bring down the Martians, or the curate, who would give up and die under the foot of the Martian march across the Continent?

Or will a simple sneeze wipe out a whole invasion force?

Highly recommended!



( )
  jmourgos | Sep 12, 2014 |
This is an excellent book, if you know the story behind It it will be awesome to read it, because you can see the great success the author had on making it look as real as possible. Orson Wells made a great adaptation of this masterpiece story that could thrill people's mind to make them go crazy believing that what they were hearing was the reality, which you may know lead to deaths, suicides, and collective hysteria among the people hearing this "radio novel".

As any other book it has recommendations that you need to follow to understand the plot of the story, there're some situations readers must not like, as, it requires of plenty of attention on the reading to really understand it, but despite of this you will love the book and read it with a lot of intrigue. This book has explanatory drawings which make easier to process the plot twists, and the climax, in the story.

I really recommend this book because is very well written, it has a great story that captures you and pushes you into continue reading it. The situations and the moods they generate are awesome because you can clearly imagine yourself as the character and live the story in your own, for example imagine you live peacefully and in a quiet night cylinders start falling around you and you see Martians going out from them, what would you feel?, and this is the most soft situation that occurs in this book. Also the character are dynamic which makes the story more complete and makes it look like they're real people with dreams, feelings, etc.

It interesting to read a book with new words, so you can expand your vocabulary, but sadly this book doesn't. ( )
  GutierrezS99 | Mar 2, 2014 |
Good book with alot of action and somewhat happy ending ( )
  BookloverA | Dec 20, 2010 |
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H. G. Wellsautor primaritotes les edicionscalculat
Sasaki, ChrisEditorautor secundaritotes les edicionsconfirmat

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An abridged version of H. G. Wells' classic science fiction tale in which, as life on Mars becomes impossible, Martians and their terrifying machines invade the Earth.

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