IniciGrupsConversesMésTendències
Cerca al lloc
Aquest lloc utilitza galetes per a oferir els nostres serveis, millorar el desenvolupament, per a anàlisis i (si no has iniciat la sessió) per a publicitat. Utilitzant LibraryThing acceptes que has llegit i entès els nostres Termes de servei i política de privacitat. L'ús que facis del lloc i dels seus serveis està subjecte a aquestes polítiques i termes.

Resultats de Google Books

Clica una miniatura per anar a Google Books.

Sabbath: The Ancient Practices de Dr. Dan B.…
S'està carregant…

Sabbath: The Ancient Practices (2009 original; edició 2010)

de Dr. Dan B. Allender Pllc (Autor), Phyllis Tickle (Editor)

Sèrie: The Ancient Practices (book 3)

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaConverses
2455110,102 (3.35)Cap
What would you do for twenty-four hours if the only criteria were to pursue your deepest joy? Dan Allender's lyrical book about the Sabbath expels the myriad myths about this "day of rest," starting with the one that paints the Sabbath as a day of forced quiet, spiritual exercises, and religious devotion and attendance. This, he says, is at odds with the ancient tradition of Sabbath as a day of delight for both body and soul. Instead, the only way we can make use of the Sabbath is to see God's original intent for the day with new eyes. In Sabbath, Allender builds a case for delight by looking at this day as a festival that celebrates God's re-creative, redemptive love using four components: - Sensual glory and beauty - Ritual - Communal feasting - Playfulness Now you can experience the delight of the Sabbath as you never have before-a day in which you receive and extend reconciliation, peace, abundance, and joy. The Ancient Practices There is a hunger in every human heart for connection, primitive and raw, to God. To satisfy it, many are beginning to explore traditional spiritual disciplines used for centuries . . . everything from fixed-hour prayer to fasting to sincere observance of the Sabbath. Compelling and readable, the Ancient Practices series is for every spiritual sojourner, for every Christian seeker who wants more.… (més)
Membre:DCofCLibrary
Títol:Sabbath: The Ancient Practices
Autors:Dr. Dan B. Allender Pllc (Autor)
Altres autors:Phyllis Tickle (Editor)
Informació:Thomas Nelson (2010), Edition: 53642nd, 224 pages
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca
Valoració:
Etiquetes:Cap

Informació de l'obra

Sabbath: The Ancient Practices de Dan Allender (2009)

Cap
S'està carregant…

Apunta't a LibraryThing per saber si aquest llibre et pot agradar.

No hi ha cap discussió a Converses sobre aquesta obra.

Es mostren totes 5
This book is part of the eight book Ancient Practices series under the general editorship of Phyllis Tickle. Others have included Fasting by Scot McKnight and Sacred Meal by Nora Gallagher.

Dan B. Allender, of Mars Hill Graduate school, has a Masters from Westminster Theological Seminary and a PhD in Counselling Psychology from Michigan State University, so is well placed to look at this important topic of Sabbath from the theological and pastoral aspects. This is a well written book, it it light, anecdotal, refreshing and lively. Sabbath, he writes, is 'not a day off, but a day of celebration and delight. The Sabbath is a day when the kingdom to come has come and is celebrated now rather than anticipated tomorrow'...it is 'far more than a diversion; it is meant to be an encounter with God's delight' (p.12).

As with all in this series the aim of the book is to consider an ancient practice, here Sabbath, in its ancient roots to its current practice. However, it concentrates on current practice with only glimpses of its 'ancient roots' in the scriptures. There is no looking at how the biblical horizon might fuse with the contemporary horizon - it's not that kind of book.

What springs to mind when we think of Sabbath? Church going, no shopping, no driving - unless its to church - a day off from the pressures of work? Allender maintains that it should be a day of delight not merely the cessation of work. God rested on the seventh day, not because he was weary, he celebrated and delighted in his creation. Allender's enthusiasm for the Sabbath comes over and provides some inspiring examples. It's a book that promises much - the first chapters were really inspiring, but the promise seemed to fade the further I went into the book, which was a shame.

This is an important topic, particularly in our work-driven culture. If this book does no more than raise the question: what does Sabbath mean for me, how can I delight in God in it and encounter God's delight through it? it will have been worthwhile. ( )
  stevebishop.uk | Jul 23, 2020 |
A discussion of the value of various rest practices under the heading of "Sabbath."

The author has many compelling points. He does well talking about both the difficulties in life which come from, are exacerbated by, or from which we run away through our cults of busyness and work as well as the work and benefits that come from intentional periods of rest. One does not generally think about all the ways that we need rest, reflection, etc. and how we in many ways are afraid of grappling with the quiet of rest or the realities staring us in the face when we decide to stop being busy for a moment.

Therefore there is much to think about and commend in terms of considering times of rest, but there is not much to commend about the Biblical exegesis of Sabbath. The author is convinced of the application of the command to observe the Sabbath upon Christians while at the same time interpreting what is involved in Sabbath in ways that would be appalling to any Sabbath-observing Jewish person. The application discussion would have gone far better if there were appropriate recognition that the seventh day observance of Sabbath is not bound on Christians, that the Law of Moses is for Israel and is not in and of itself bound on Christians, and that the Christian's true Sabbath rest will come when we rest from our labors as God did from His (Hebrews 4:1-11). Such a view can liberate the idea of rest from the strictures of the seventh-day observance and the interminable disputations about what is and what is not rest, but that is not the option the author chose. Thus there is great confusion: the Sabbath is a commandment, but the suggested practice of Sabbath looks absolutely nothing like the Sabbath as commanded.

Thus the applications are worthy of consideration, but consider the doctrinal argumentation to be quite suspect. ( )
  deusvitae | Sep 16, 2014 |
This was unexpected.

When I started to read a book whose purpose is to promote modern-day Sabbath keeping, I fully expected the modern approach, "let's not be legalistic here..." Instead, Allender based his book in the fourth commandment: remember the Sabbath and keep it holy.

That said, don't expect a legalistic throwback to your grandfather's era. In fact, Allender does a better job than anyone I've read at portraying the Sabbath as a delight. I would suggest that you read this book on a Friday, because you'll want to enjoy a real full Sabbath as soon as you're finished reading!

The book is laid out in three sections. First, he establishes the four pillars of Sabbath-keeping: senses, time, feast, and play. This was the highlight of the book. From there, he looks at the purpose of the Sabbath, and then on to how to participate in Sabbath keeping.

Allender's prose is poetic. It's the sort of prose that wraps you in and allows you to savor every syllable. Don't try to read this book to extract information—reading it is an experience—a joy—in itself. Take this, for example, "The Trinity joins us with all others, including the earth itself, in a relationship that is based on the commonality of being made in the image of God. We are bound to one another, and we are called to adore and honor the earth as God's art, especially on the day that God has set aside to marvel at his own creation" (68).

Whether you keep the Sabbath or not, this book is a glorious read.

Disclaimer: I received this book for free as a member of Thomas Nelson’s Booksneeze program. ( )
  StephenBarkley | Jan 27, 2011 |
I have read a number of the installments in the The Ancient Practices series this past year. Here I just finished reading Sabbath: The Ancient Practices written by Dan Allender. Remember the Sabbath and keep it Holy is one of the Ten Commandments given in the Old Testament. What does it really mean to keep it Holy? Remembering the Sabbath is most likely the most misunderstood of the commandments according to Allender.

In his book he tries to remedy that in a study of the origins and purpose of Sabbath. Through out his writing he is careful to define what Sabbath is not, not to drift into legalism and express the importance of setting one day aside to experience a day of delight. Allender begins the book by describing the pillars of Sabbath--sensual glory, holy time, communal feast, and play day.

He then moves into the purpose of Sabbath, which is mostly delight. This “day of delight” as instituted by God, has become simply a break from the busyness of the work week but it is so much more. When the God commands us to rest on Sabbath it means more than ceasing from all activity. God made creation in 6 days and rested on the 7th day. Allender bases his premise on the Hebrew word for rest, Menuha, which is best translated as joyous repose, tranquility, or delight. So God delighted in creation on the Sabbath (derives from the Hebrew shabbat (שבת), "to cease")

So, what keeps us from properly understanding, sanctifying and celebrating this important day? Allender looks at not only the history of this discipline, going all the way back to ancient Israel, but also at the modern manifestations and misunderstandings of its practice.. It is through this lens that he resurrects this lost definition of what it really means to rest.

On Sabbath we are to separate ourselves from the stress of our lives and celebrate the joy of God our creator. Allender acknowledges that it is difficult to dedicate one day to experiencing joy and beauty and delight. It might be hard to dedicate one day in a lifetime to that, much less one day each week! Yet, he invites us to make a concerted effort to do so. Allender examines how we treat time in this over-stressed twenty-first century world and encourages us to take a second look at the value of taking that weekly Sabbath to sanctify time. He also discusses the value of feasting and of play. It will take some preparation on the other days of the week, but we need to open our hearts to the gift of the Sabbath.

The only criticism of this book is that Allender didn't seem to place much value on attending religious services on Saturday or Sunday. My sense is that he tried to make this book accessible to all people of faith, even those who consider themselves to be "spiritual but not religious." Overall, however, Allender offers considerable food for thought. ( )
  moses917 | Feb 19, 2010 |
This is BY FAR the most beautiful book I have read--EVER!! Whatever your religious belief, this book will enhance and enrich your experience of sucking the marrow of joy and beauty from your life. The book reads like pure poetry. I tried not to read it too quickly, because I just wanted to SAVOR the book--like an exquisite meal. ( )
  SandraDoran | Nov 19, 2009 |
Es mostren totes 5
Sense ressenyes | afegeix-hi una ressenya

Pertany a aquestes sèries

Has d'iniciar sessió per poder modificar les dades del coneixement compartit.
Si et cal més ajuda, mira la pàgina d'ajuda del coneixement compartit.
Títol normalitzat
Títol original
Títols alternatius
Data original de publicació
Gent/Personatges
Llocs importants
Esdeveniments importants
Pel·lícules relacionades
Epígraf
Dedicatòria
Primeres paraules
Citacions
Darreres paraules
Nota de desambiguació
Editor de l'editorial
Creadors de notes promocionals a la coberta
Llengua original
CDD/SMD canònics
LCC canònic

Referències a aquesta obra en fonts externes.

Wikipedia en anglès

Cap

What would you do for twenty-four hours if the only criteria were to pursue your deepest joy? Dan Allender's lyrical book about the Sabbath expels the myriad myths about this "day of rest," starting with the one that paints the Sabbath as a day of forced quiet, spiritual exercises, and religious devotion and attendance. This, he says, is at odds with the ancient tradition of Sabbath as a day of delight for both body and soul. Instead, the only way we can make use of the Sabbath is to see God's original intent for the day with new eyes. In Sabbath, Allender builds a case for delight by looking at this day as a festival that celebrates God's re-creative, redemptive love using four components: - Sensual glory and beauty - Ritual - Communal feasting - Playfulness Now you can experience the delight of the Sabbath as you never have before-a day in which you receive and extend reconciliation, peace, abundance, and joy. The Ancient Practices There is a hunger in every human heart for connection, primitive and raw, to God. To satisfy it, many are beginning to explore traditional spiritual disciplines used for centuries . . . everything from fixed-hour prayer to fasting to sincere observance of the Sabbath. Compelling and readable, the Ancient Practices series is for every spiritual sojourner, for every Christian seeker who wants more.

No s'han trobat descripcions de biblioteca.

Descripció del llibre
Sumari haiku

Debats actuals

Cap

Cobertes populars

Dreceres

Valoració

Mitjana: (3.35)
0.5
1
1.5
2 2
2.5
3 6
3.5 1
4 2
4.5
5 2

Ets tu?

Fes-te Autor del LibraryThing.

 

Quant a | Contacte | LibraryThing.com | Privadesa/Condicions | Ajuda/PMF | Blog | Botiga | APIs | TinyCat | Biblioteques llegades | Crítics Matiners | Coneixement comú | 206,069,084 llibres! | Barra superior: Sempre visible