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A Mighty Long Way: My Journey to Justice at…
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A Mighty Long Way: My Journey to Justice at Little Rock Central High… (edició 2010)

de Carlotta Walls Lanier (Autor), Bill Clinton (Pròleg)

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1415148,823 (4.09)3
When 14-year-old Carlotta Walls walked up to Little Rock Central High School on September 25, 1957, she and eight other black students only wanted to make it to class. But the journey of the "Little Rock Nine" would lead the nation on an even longer and much more turbulent path, one that would challenge prevailing attitudes, break down barriers, and forever change America. Descended from a line of proud black landowners and businessmen, Carlotta was raised to believe that education was the key to success. After Brown v. Board of Education, the teenager volunteered to be among the first black students--she was the youngest--to integrate nearby Central High School. But getting through the door was only the first of many trials. This inspiring memoir is not only a testament to the power of one to make a difference but also of the sacrifices made by families and communities that found themselves a part of history.--From publisher description.… (més)
Membre:LisaJordan
Títol:A Mighty Long Way: My Journey to Justice at Little Rock Central High School
Autors:Carlotta Walls Lanier (Autor)
Altres autors:Bill Clinton (Pròleg)
Informació:One World (2010), Edition: Reprint, 336 pages
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca
Valoració:
Etiquetes:No n'hi ha cap

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A Mighty Long Way: My Journey to Justice at Little Rock Central High School de Carlotta Walls LaNier

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Es mostren totes 5
Gave me a new appreciation for the day to day realities of growing up and living in pre-integration South, as well as the toll racism takes on individuals and society. An inspiring story of courage and perseverance. ( )
  csmith0406 | Mar 18, 2016 |
I did not read this book, but thought it would be a good read in a history or english class to understand life during the civil rights era.
  sbalicki | Mar 14, 2015 |
Carlotta Walls Lanier was a member of the original Little Rock Nine -- a group of young people who integrated Little Rock (Arkansas) Central High School. Her memoir joins several others in recounting the prejudice, fear, and violence of that time. Unlike "Warriors Don't Cry" Carlotta takes a slightly wider angle to the subject. She actually spent two years (most only passed one) at the high school and, in addition, tells of her life after the event. While she suffered only minor scrapes and humiliations, her parents' house was bombed and, most tragically, a family member was blamed (all evidence suggests it was local segregationists). Unlike her colleagues, Lanier has mixed feelings with her role in the event and often kept her past a secret.

While articulate and thoughtful, Lanier's tone is amazingly dispassionate. Her objective voice makes the horrifying abuse she endured all the more credible. At the same time, this reader wanted a bit more emotion, at times. She is not very forthcoming of her inner-most feelings (e.g., she talks about a girl stepping on the backs of her heels -- months of abuse -- with little rancor; she introduces her husband-to-be almost as an afterthought.) "Warriors...", in contrast, churns with emotions. The person truly interested in this dark hour in American history should read both books. ( )
  mjspear | Jun 13, 2012 |
This is a "good for you" sort of book - particularly for those of us who didn't live through the civil rights turmoil of the 50s and 60s - but it's not a miserable read. Perhaps not delightful, but do-able. One I'd definitely recommend. Be sure you stick it out through the conclusion - Mrs. Walls' viewpoint on the election of President Obama is enough to bring tears to your eyes.
  KC_in_KS | Aug 3, 2011 |
After hearing a half-hour segment of NPR's Talk of the Nation (the radio show that gets me through the work week!) featuring Carlotta Walls LaNier of the Little Rock Nine, I was inspired to pick up her memoir at the library—A Mighty Long Way: My Journey to Justice at Little Rock Central High School.

As a bit of a history lesson, the Supreme Court declared segregation unconstitutional in the 1954 case of Brown vs. Board of Education. When the city of Little Rock, Arkansas, was forced to integrate in 1957, Carlotta was the youngest of nine African-American students—known as the Little Rock Nine—that enrolled in the all-white Central High School. The ensuing crisis that eventually led to intervention by President Eisenhower and the 101st Airborne can be considered one of the most important events in the Civil Rights Movement.

U.S. History 101 tells you the story of the Little Rock Nine, but LaNier's memoir gives a perspective rarely seen. When an event becomes such a defining point of the historical record and when it seems so far in the past that it is hard to relate to, these events seem to just stick on the page of a history book. They don't come alive. We forget that real people went through this, that real emotions were felt and that people's lives were immediately affected by the stories we hear and read. LaNier details the day-to-day excitement, anxiety, and fear that defined her three years at Central. We see her mind develop as she processes the events surrounding her. We get a glimpse into the ordinary life of someone who turned out to be such an extraordinary icon in American history. We get a personal account of a story that is usually told in such an impersonal manner.

Sometimes in a memoir, the author will ramble on about day-to-day events that seem so inconsequential. And for most people, they are. They're boring and have no relevance to anything. But in this book, the mundane is important, because it just builds up the tension of the whole story. Not once did I think that LaNier was rambling. Nor would I criticize her for being self-promoting as many memoir authors in her position are. Instead, I am glad to have gotten a glimpse into an event that otherwise seems so distant. ( )
  kari1016 | Nov 30, 2009 |
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Nom de l'autorCàrrecTipus d'autorObra?Estat
Carlotta Walls LaNierautor primaritotes les edicionscalculat
Page, Lisa Frazierautor principaltotes les edicionsconfirmat
Clinton, BillPròlegautor secundaritotes les edicionsconfirmat
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When 14-year-old Carlotta Walls walked up to Little Rock Central High School on September 25, 1957, she and eight other black students only wanted to make it to class. But the journey of the "Little Rock Nine" would lead the nation on an even longer and much more turbulent path, one that would challenge prevailing attitudes, break down barriers, and forever change America. Descended from a line of proud black landowners and businessmen, Carlotta was raised to believe that education was the key to success. After Brown v. Board of Education, the teenager volunteered to be among the first black students--she was the youngest--to integrate nearby Central High School. But getting through the door was only the first of many trials. This inspiring memoir is not only a testament to the power of one to make a difference but also of the sacrifices made by families and communities that found themselves a part of history.--From publisher description.

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