IniciGrupsConversesMésTendències
Cerca al lloc
Aquest lloc utilitza galetes per a oferir els nostres serveis, millorar el desenvolupament, per a anàlisis i (si no has iniciat la sessió) per a publicitat. Utilitzant LibraryThing acceptes que has llegit i entès els nostres Termes de servei i política de privacitat. L'ús que facis del lloc i dels seus serveis està subjecte a aquestes polítiques i termes.
Hide this

Resultats de Google Books

Clica una miniatura per anar a Google Books.

S'està carregant…

Viola Desmond Won't Be Budged

de Jody Nyasha Warner

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaConverses
758284,910 (3.67)No n'hi ha cap
Finalist for the 2011 Norma Fleck Award for Canadian Children's Non-Fiction "On behalf of the Nova Scotia government, I sincerely apologize to Mrs. Viola Desmond's family and to all African Nova Scotians for the racial discrimination she was subjected to by the justice system . . . We recognize today that the act for which Viola Desmond was arrested, was an act of courage, not an offence." -- Darrell Dexter, Premier of Nova Scotia, April 15, 2010 In Nova Scotia, in 1946, an usher in a movie theatre told Viola Desmond to move from her main floor seat up to the balcony. She refused to budge. Viola knew she was being asked to move because she was black. After all, she was the only black person downstairs. All the other black people were up in the balcony. In no time at all, the police arrived and took Viola to jail. The next day she was charged and fined, but she vowed to continue her struggle against such unfair rules. She refused to accept that being black meant she couldn't sit where she wanted. Viola's determination gave strength and inspiration to her community at the time. She is an unsung hero of the North American struggle against injustice and racial discrimination whose story deserves to be widely known. The African Canadian community in Nova Scotia is one of Canada's oldest and most established black communities. Despite their history and contributions to the province the people in this community have a long experience of racially based injustice. Like Claudette Colvin and Rosa Parks, who many years later, in 1955, refused to give up their bus seats in Alabama, Desmond's act of refusal awakened people to the unacceptable nature of racism and began and process of bringing an end to racial segregation in Canada. An afterword provides a glimpse of African Canadian history.… (més)
S'està carregant…

Apunta't a LibraryThing per saber si aquest llibre et pot agradar.

No hi ha cap discussió a Converses sobre aquesta obra.

Es mostren 1-5 de 8 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Viola Desmond was a black woman who tried to see a movie while in Nova Scotia. Because of segregation, she was forced from her seat by police and taken to court, where she was fined. This outraged her and her community and together they fought for equal rights. I thought this book shined light on a lesser known civil rights activist. I had never heard her story or her name before. I also thought it was interesting to read about segregation struggles that happened in places other than America, which is what people are typically taught about. I wish the book would have went into more detail about Viola Desmond's fight for equal rights, but overall I still enjoyed it. ( )
  SophiaLCastillo | Jan 21, 2020 |
Viola Desmond live in Canada. She owned Vi's Studio beauty parlor. Viola had to attend a meeting and her car randomly broke down. Viola decided to go to the theater while waiting for her car to be fixed. However, it as 1946 and Canada was segregated. Viola found the perfect seat in the theater and the usher asked her to move. Colored people had to sit on the balcony and she was in the whits only section. Viola did not move and she was arrested. Viola was later found guilty in court and had to pay the fine the judge gave her. Viola was mad at the situation and she planned to end segregation in Canada. By the late 1950's segregation was made against the law.

I never realized segregation was once in Canada until I read this book. Viola Desmond is part of Canadian history. She is significant because she changed Canadian history when she sat out to end segregation. Viola Desmond's actions reminds me of Rosa Parks.

The accuracy and organization of the book is fine. The book has a rhyme scheme as you read. The book also does not have the best attention grabber when reading the book. The book just reminds me a lot of Rosa Parks. ( )
  A.Bode | Jan 29, 2019 |
Viola starts the story faced with a small problem which soon escalates to a larger more important problem. Her car breaks down in a small town in Canada so she decides to go see a movie at the local theatre. Not knowing it was a segregated theatre, she sits right in the front which apparently were seats saved for ‘white’ people and not, as the usher says, for “...you people…” But Viola, already having a bad day, decided to take a stand when few others would. Her stand cost her a night in prison and a penalty of $20. After appeals and protests she was still found guilty of “not paying the proper ticket price.” At the end of the day she did not win her battle but she was a role model for future resistance to segregation in Canada and by the late 50’s segregation was outlawed. I do wished the book had more content and provided me with more information of background story of her time. ( )
  Rvalencia | Feb 1, 2018 |
Viola was arrested because she wanted to sit in a seat at the theater and she wasn't allowed. She was arrested. She tried to get them to pass a no segregation law. She failed but it was later passed and accepted.
  tina265 | Feb 26, 2014 |
Overall, I liked this book. It was a little dry and didn't grab my attention the way I thought a book should, but it was informative. The two main things I liked about the book were the illustrations and content of the story.

The illustrations were vivid and bright, the way I envisioned Viola’s personality. I felt this was intentional and added to the emotion of the story, much more so than the words.

Naively, I had never considered that Canada even had a civil rights movement. Canada was where the US slaves fled to for freedom, so I ignorantly assumed Canada was a country who didn't go through the same nasty history as the United States.

This book shed light on the fact that African Canadians had to fight for their rights in the same way as African Americans.
The main point of this book was to shed light on a brave woman who stood her ground against unfair treatment. ( )
  Tammie14 | Oct 26, 2013 |
Es mostren 1-5 de 8 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Sense ressenyes | afegeix-hi una ressenya
Has d'iniciar sessió per poder modificar les dades del coneixement compartit.
Si et cal més ajuda, mira la pàgina d'ajuda del coneixement compartit.
Títol normalitzat
Títol original
Títols alternatius
Data original de publicació
Gent/Personatges
Llocs importants
Esdeveniments importants
Pel·lícules relacionades
Premis i honors
Epígraf
Dedicatòria
Primeres paraules
Citacions
Darreres paraules
Nota de desambiguació
Editor de l'editorial
Creadors de notes promocionals a la coberta
Llengua original
CDD/SMD canònics
LCC canònic

Referències a aquesta obra en fonts externes.

Wikipedia en anglès

No n'hi ha cap

Finalist for the 2011 Norma Fleck Award for Canadian Children's Non-Fiction "On behalf of the Nova Scotia government, I sincerely apologize to Mrs. Viola Desmond's family and to all African Nova Scotians for the racial discrimination she was subjected to by the justice system . . . We recognize today that the act for which Viola Desmond was arrested, was an act of courage, not an offence." -- Darrell Dexter, Premier of Nova Scotia, April 15, 2010 In Nova Scotia, in 1946, an usher in a movie theatre told Viola Desmond to move from her main floor seat up to the balcony. She refused to budge. Viola knew she was being asked to move because she was black. After all, she was the only black person downstairs. All the other black people were up in the balcony. In no time at all, the police arrived and took Viola to jail. The next day she was charged and fined, but she vowed to continue her struggle against such unfair rules. She refused to accept that being black meant she couldn't sit where she wanted. Viola's determination gave strength and inspiration to her community at the time. She is an unsung hero of the North American struggle against injustice and racial discrimination whose story deserves to be widely known. The African Canadian community in Nova Scotia is one of Canada's oldest and most established black communities. Despite their history and contributions to the province the people in this community have a long experience of racially based injustice. Like Claudette Colvin and Rosa Parks, who many years later, in 1955, refused to give up their bus seats in Alabama, Desmond's act of refusal awakened people to the unacceptable nature of racism and began and process of bringing an end to racial segregation in Canada. An afterword provides a glimpse of African Canadian history.

No s'han trobat descripcions de biblioteca.

Descripció del llibre
Sumari haiku

Cobertes populars

Dreceres

Valoració

Mitjana: (3.67)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3 6
3.5
4 8
4.5
5 1

Ets tu?

Fes-te Autor del LibraryThing.

 

Quant a | Contacte | LibraryThing.com | Privadesa/Condicions | Ajuda/PMF | Blog | Botiga | APIs | TinyCat | Biblioteques llegades | Crítics Matiners | Coneixement comú | 162,408,837 llibres! | Barra superior: Sempre visible