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The Saint and the Sultan: The Crusades,…
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The Saint and the Sultan: The Crusades, Islam, and Francis of Assisi's… (edició 2009)

de Paul Moses (Autor)

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663310,395 (3.5)No n'hi ha cap
An intriguing examination of the extraordinary-and little known meeting between St. Francis of Assisi and Islamic leader Sultan Malik Al-Kamil that has strong resonance in today's divided world. For many of us, St. Francis of Assisi is known as a poor monk and a lover of animals. However, these images are sadly incomplete, because they ignore an equally important and more challenging aspect of his life -- his unwavering commitment to seeking peace. In The Saint and the Sultan, Paul Moses recovers Francis' s message of peace through the largely forgotten story of his daring mission to end the crusades. In 1219, as the Fifth Crusade was being fought, Francis crossed enemy lines to gain an audience with Malik al-Kamil, the Sultan of Egypt. The two talked of war and peace and faith and when Francis returned home, he proposed that his Order of the Friars Minor live peaceably among the followers of Islam-a revolutionary call at a moment when Christendom pinned its hopes for converting Muslims on the battlefield. The Saint and the Sultan captures the lives of St. Francis and Sultan al-Kamil and illuminates the political intrigue and religious fervor of their time.nbsp;In the process, itnbsp;reveals a startlingly timely story of interfaith conflict, war, and the search for peace. More than simply a dramatic adventure, though it does not lack for colorful saints and sinners, loyalty and betrayal, and thrilling Crusade narrative, The Saint and the Sultan brings to life an episode of deep relevance for all who seek to find peace between the West and the Islamic world. Winner of the 2010 Catholic Press Association Book Award for History… (més)
Membre:eigonzalez
Títol:The Saint and the Sultan: The Crusades, Islam, and Francis of Assisi's Mission of Peace
Autors:Paul Moses (Autor)
Informació:Image (2009), Edition: Illustrated, 320 pages
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca
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Etiquetes:No n'hi ha cap

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The Saint and the Sultan: The Crusades, Islam, and Francis of Assisi's Mission of Peace de Paul Moses

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By Amazon.com Reviewer, Trudie Barreras

Although I became aware several years ago of Paul Moses’ book “The Saint and the Sultan” re-visioning the extraordinary meeting between St. Francis of Assisi and Sultan Malik al-Kamil of Egypt, and had planned to obtain it, other events intervened. Recently, however, I have been receiving various communications from conservative friends that led me to recall my intention. Specifically, I was “treated” to a rather absurd assertion that since the First Crusade had been self-defense because Muslims had attacked Christians in the Holy Land, therefore all subsequent wars of aggression perpetrated against believers in Allah by so-called followers of Christ should be viewed in that same light.

Paul Moses has accomplished a truly amazing feat of investigative historical writing in terms of ferreting out the story of this amazing encounter between the saint and the sultan, in view of the fact that during the decades following the death (and almost immediate canonization) of St. Francis of Assisi “official” biographies were fabricated to completely obscure the true purpose and message of this encounter. In addition, earlier writings were banned, and as much as possible, destroyed. The bare bones of the story Moses tells involve Francis’ absolute determination to take literally the admonition of Jesus to love our enemies. He was also a committed pacifist, absolutely opposed to war in any form, believing that the only God-sanctioned way of converting those who did not believe in Jesus was by loving encounter, not disputation or coercion or violence. Finally, of course, St. Francis was totally committed to the ethos of poverty, believing that the only true way to follow Jesus was to give up all worldly possessions and ambitions and become authentic servants of all.

In 1219, the Fifth Crusade, promoted initially by Pope Innocent III, was a blatant attempt to conquer Egypt for political and economic gain. Although the “excuse” was the “liberation of Jerusalem” which had been conquered by Saladin during the previous Crusade, as a matter of fact one of the peace offers made by Sultan Malik al-Kamil would have involved turning Jerusalem back over to the Christians in return for being left alone in North Africa. No dice; the pope and others wanted the city of Damietta for the trade advantages it would assure, and had ambitions to control all Egypt as well.

Paul Moses completes his remarkable account of the commitment of St. Francis to sincere dialog with followers of Islam with parallels to the current situation which are inescapable. We are fully aware, after a history of nearly 800 years of essentially continuous warfare between those who profess to follow Jesus and those who claim loyalty to the teachings of Mohammad that neither group is anywhere near achieving the “conversion” of the other. Instead, both sides have demonstrated unequivocally that they are completely faithless with respect to the teachings of their founders. However, as a follower of Jesus myself, I have to assert that I believe, as St. Francis did, that WE are the most to blame; the Prophet of Islam was NOT the “Prince of Peace” that we claim Jesus was, nor do Muslims believe that he spoke and taught as God Incarnate. They perhaps therefore have more justification for believing in the more militant will of the God of Abraham, the Allah they worship. Yet if we dare to proclaim we represent Jesus while we utterly ignore his admonition to love our enemies, turn the other cheek, do good to those who hurt us, and refrain from killing in any mode, are we not in fact being the Infidels that many followers of Islam consider us to be?
  societystf | Jul 12, 2017 |
Your contribution of this book to the collection whether by Virtual lending or by outright donation to the collection--would be most appreciated!
  societystf | Apr 6, 2016 |
An interesting and important book for highlighting an episode of Saint Francis's life that has been largely forgotten, due primarily to efforts by the Catholic Church and Francis's own order centuries ago. Moses helps recapture a key component of Francis's teaching -- nonviolence -- and thus links him to more recent figures such as Mohandas Gandhi and Martin Luther King, Jr., as a proponent of seeking social change through peaceful coexistence, discussion, and example.

Moses is absolutely correct in identifying this episode, and the convictions behind it, as an important event for people of our time to ponder. Alongside and (mostly) beneath the Crusading zeal of the papacy and (some of) the medieval nobility ran a not-inconsequential strain of thought that believed in and sought mutual respect and understanding between Christians and Muslims, and it can help our efforts toward those ends today to realize that these goals are not merely the product of our time, of an age when the West no longer thinks in terms of "Christendom" and universities feature courses in comparative religion, but instead have existed for many centuries, even during the times when the divide between the two faiths flared most violently.

The main difficulty with Moses's book is that the story of Saint Francis's encounter with the Sultan Malik al-Kamil of Egypt is scantily recorded, and thus cannot fill even a relatively short book. Moses fills it out with a good summary of Francis's life before the event, and with an insightful analysis of how and why subsequent accounts -- including those written not long after Francis's death -- downplayed, distorted or outright omitted the remarkable meeting between the two men. Nevertheless, there's a fair amount of repetition. Moses might have done better spending more time placing Francis within the tradition of medieval thinkers who sought peaceful accord with Islam -- that would have filled out the book nicely, even at greater length.

Still and all, Moses brings to popular attention an important and inspiration event that might offer readers of today ideas and hope for bridging the gap between the faiths. Knowing that so revered a figure as Saint Francis believed it could be done, and took such risks to try to realize his dream, should make clear to all that mistrust, enmity and war are not the inevitable conditions of the relationship between the Muslim and Christian worlds. ( )
  robkill | Mar 1, 2010 |
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No n'hi ha cap

An intriguing examination of the extraordinary-and little known meeting between St. Francis of Assisi and Islamic leader Sultan Malik Al-Kamil that has strong resonance in today's divided world. For many of us, St. Francis of Assisi is known as a poor monk and a lover of animals. However, these images are sadly incomplete, because they ignore an equally important and more challenging aspect of his life -- his unwavering commitment to seeking peace. In The Saint and the Sultan, Paul Moses recovers Francis' s message of peace through the largely forgotten story of his daring mission to end the crusades. In 1219, as the Fifth Crusade was being fought, Francis crossed enemy lines to gain an audience with Malik al-Kamil, the Sultan of Egypt. The two talked of war and peace and faith and when Francis returned home, he proposed that his Order of the Friars Minor live peaceably among the followers of Islam-a revolutionary call at a moment when Christendom pinned its hopes for converting Muslims on the battlefield. The Saint and the Sultan captures the lives of St. Francis and Sultan al-Kamil and illuminates the political intrigue and religious fervor of their time.nbsp;In the process, itnbsp;reveals a startlingly timely story of interfaith conflict, war, and the search for peace. More than simply a dramatic adventure, though it does not lack for colorful saints and sinners, loyalty and betrayal, and thrilling Crusade narrative, The Saint and the Sultan brings to life an episode of deep relevance for all who seek to find peace between the West and the Islamic world. Winner of the 2010 Catholic Press Association Book Award for History

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