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The New Jim Crow (Mass Incarceration in the…
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The New Jim Crow (Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness - 10th… (edició 2020)

de Michelle Alexander (Autor)

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3,7841092,488 (4.43)291
This work argues that the War on Drugs and policies that deny convicted felons equal access to employment, housing, education, and public benefits create a permanent under caste based largely on race. As the United States celebrates the nation's "triumph over race" with the election of Barack Obama, the majority of young black men in major American cities are locked behind bars or have been labeled felons for life. Although Jim Crow laws have been wiped off the books, an astounding percentage of the African American community remains trapped in a subordinate status - much like their grandparents before them. In this incisive critique, former litigator-turned-legal-scholar Michelle Alexander provocatively argues that we have not ended racial caste in America: we have simply redesigned it. Alexander shows that, by targeting black men and decimating communities of color, the U.S. criminal justice system functions as a contemporary system of racial control, even as it formally adheres to the principle of color blindness. The New Jim Crow challenges the civil rights community - and all of us - to place mass incarceration at the forefront of a new movement for racial justice in America.… (més)
Membre:howmakirolls
Títol:The New Jim Crow (Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness - 10th Anniversary Edition)
Autors:Michelle Alexander (Autor)
Informació:NEW PRESS (2020), Edition: 1, 352 pages
Col·leccions:La teva biblioteca
Valoració:
Etiquetes:No n'hi ha cap

Detalls de l'obra

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness de Michelle Alexander (Author)

  1. 00
    Black And Catholic in the Jim Crow South: The Stuff That Makes Community de Danny Duncan Collum (fulner)
    fulner: Black and Catholic explorers the loves of those who loved through double discrimination. In 21st century America we have a hard time imaging Southern Baptists and Catholics being bitter enemies but in the Jim crow South Catholics were less trusted than negros, a black one even worse. The new Jim crow shows the legal separation of the mid 20th century still e exists but in a way now the white liberals don't care.… (més)
  2. 00
    Hood Feminism: Notes from the Women That a Movement Forgot de Mikki Kendall (fannyprice)
  3. 00
    Nobody: Casualties of America's War on the Vulnerable, from Ferguson to Flint and Beyond de Marc Lamont Hill (Othemts)
  4. 00
    Crime Control as Industry de Nils Christie (davidgn)
  5. 00
    A Costly American Hatred de Joseph Rodney Dole (arethusarose)
    arethusarose: A broad look at the American penal system with an emphasis on Illinois. What is astonishing about this book is that the author is in prison in Illinois, spent years in a supermax prison, and yet managed to do substantial research and construct clear, cogent work on the US penal system. He is also brave to publish this work while still in prison.… (més)
  6. 00
    Ghettoside: A True Story of Murder in America de Jill Leovy (RidgewayGirl)
    RidgewayGirl: Books deal with different, but related issues. Both are important.
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» Mira també 291 mencions

Es mostren 1-5 de 110 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Este libro desafía la idea de que con el inicio de la era Obama se haya proclamado el final del racismo y estemos en una nueva etapa de daltonismo social. La autora argumenta de forma persuasiva que la enorme disparidad racial en el castigo penal en Estados Unidos no es meramente el resultado de una acción neutral por parte del Estado. Para ella, el aumento del encarcelamiento masivo abre un nuevo frente en la lucha histórica por la justicia racial. No hemos terminado la casta racial en América; simplemente la hemos rediseñado. Apuntando una potente denuncia sobre la Guerra contra la Droga que está diezmando las comunidades de color, el sistema de justicia criminal estadounidense funciona como un sistema contemporáneo de control permanente.

El libro de Michelle Alexander arroja nuevas perspectivas sobre la profunda injusticia que se está produciendo hoy en EE.UU., planteando una pregunta básica: ¿Cómo ha sido el tratamiento a la comunidad negra a lo largo de toda su historia? Primero fue la Esclavitud, luego Jim Crow, la segregación, el terror del Ku Klux Klan, etc. Hoy es la brutalidad y el asesinato por parte de la policía, la criminalización al por mayor y el encarcelamiento en masa. Una vez más, la discriminación ha sido legalizada e institucionalizada.
  bibliotecayamaguchi | Sep 20, 2021 |
I can see why this book was getting so much love around June 2020 – it’s a strong argument against the “war on drugs” and incarceration because of the disproportionate it affect it has on Black men. As of now, it’s a bit of an older book, enough so that it warranted a lengthy introduction by Alexander in the 10th anniversary edition explaining the choice to focus of Black men and the way Obama’s presidency did not improve the overall situation as she explains it.

A lot of The New Jim Crow made me think, which is the best thing in non-fiction books, especially those centered around social justice. Despite my efforts at educating myself and being bettering humbles me in remembering that I have barely scratched the surface in discovering how deeply systematic racism defines the United States. Take Obama’s presidency for example – I agree with Alexander when she states that many people look at that and assume things are getting better. I come from a place of privilege to be able to even consider such things when a firm picture from a different perspective so clearly illustrates how prejudiced the system is.

Alexander presents her case with a strong voice and a surplus of evidence. In many ways, I felt she was simply lifting the veil to things that should be obvious. I found the conversation on “color blindness” particularly interesting as in the last few years we’ve learned how damaging that perspective can be.

The New Jim Crow is essential reading for anyone who is serious about their antiracism work. Full stop. This is an excellent book, extremely educational, well-written, and eye-opening. If you care about equity in the United States, this is a good place to learn about oppression as executed through the criminal justice system. ( )
  Morteana | Sep 16, 2021 |
Summer 2020 (May? June?);

It's been too long to do this review proper justice (though all the reviews today have been so light and scant as I try to catch up like twenty or thirty of them and get myself when I can start doing them weekly/biweekly again), but this book was incredibly stark, harrowing, and educational. There was so much I did not know about our legal system at all before reading this book, about the grey spaces, and the deviousness of cultural traps that I only barely new about facing the black community, and especially black boys/men.

I think everyone (especially every educator) should read this book. ( )
  wanderlustlover | Aug 21, 2021 |
I'm honestly not 100% sure what to say in this review. Even ten years after its first publication, Michelle Alexander's book is extremely powerful and poignant. As I read the book, it continually made me think of how exactly I viewed the world around me. I've always seen myself as an open-minded person, and I always try to stand up for others when and where I can. The New Jim Crow really made me think about what exactly I wasn't seeing or noticing in the world around me. With all the unrest currently plaguing the US right now, this is definitely a must-read book for everyone. ( )
  historybookreads | Jul 26, 2021 |
Michelle Alexander begins her book positing that the high percentage of young black men in U.S. prisons is a demonstration of continuing racist policies in this Country. Her claim is that white majority treatment has evolved over time from an era of slavery, to an era of Jim Crow laws, and now to the current War on Drugs, all intended to suppress the black minority.

While I found the premise difficult to accept, she does manage to offer a number of logical thoughts in support of her ideas, and certainly gives the reader something to think about.

The majority of inmates in federal prisons may well be incarcerated for drug law violations, and the majority of those in prison are also non-white. Those facts are hardly indicative of racial motivations. However, knowing those facts, it seems reasonable that in fighting the war on drugs, the apparently logical focus for attention and drug raids would be in minority communities. Then again, it is interesting to consider for a moment what might have occurred if the initial drug raids took place on college campuses instead of in minority communities. Drug use is hardly a stranger in either environment. The question Alexander hints at is whether the war on drugs would have been as vigilantly enforced if the initial population of drug law violators targeted were white college fraternity members, and whether the best location of drug raids would have been colleges and universities vs. inner city ghettos.

I think Alexander's premise is a hard sell, but her message seems to have found resonance elsewhere in society. A recent award winning documentary at the 2012 Sundance Film festival titled "The House I Live In" by Eugene Jarecki deals with a very similar subject, and examines the profound human rights implications of the U.S. drug policy, from the dealer to the narcotics officer, the inmate to the federal judge. There's also a movement in the State of California to ease the tough three-strikes sentencing law which often leads to long sentences for minor drug infractions.

So even if you can't agree with all of Michelle Alexander's points, her views are well stated, and she offers an interesting take and perspective. The points in this book certainly gives readers something to think about and discuss. ( )
  rsutto22 | Jul 15, 2021 |
Es mostren 1-5 de 110 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Quoting Alexander: "I consider myself a prison abolitionist, in the sense that I think we will eventually end the prisons as we know them. That doesn’t mean that I don’t think we don’t need to remove people from the community who pose a serious threat or who cause serious harm for some period of time. But the question is do we want to create and maintain sites that are designed for the intentional infliction of needless suffering? Because that’s what prison is today. They are sites where we treat people as less than human and put them in literal cages and intentionally inflict harm and suffering on them and then expect that this will somehow improve them. It’s nonsensical, immoral, and counterproductive, and that is what I would like to see come to an end."
 
Contrary to the rosy picture of race embodied in Barack Obama's political success and Oprah Winfrey's financial success, legal scholar Alexander argues vigorously and persuasively that [w]e have not ended racial caste in America; we have merely redesigned it. Jim Crow and legal racial segregation has been replaced by mass incarceration as a system of social control (More African Americans are under correctional control today... than were enslaved in 1850). Alexander reviews American racial history from the colonies to the Clinton administration, delineating its transformation into the war on drugs. She offers an acute analysis of the effect of this mass incarceration upon former inmates who will be discriminated against, legally, for the rest of their lives, denied employment, housing, education, and public benefits. Most provocatively, she reveals how both the move toward colorblindness and affirmative action may blur our vision of injustice: most Americans know and don't know the truth about mass incarceration—but her carefully researched, deeply engaging, and thoroughly readable book should change that.
afegit per 2wonderY | editaPublisher's Weekly
 

» Afegeix-hi altres autors (7 possibles)

Nom de l'autorCàrrecTipus d'autorObra?Estat
Alexander, MichelleAutorautor primaritotes les edicionsconfirmat
Chilton, KarenNarradorautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
West, CornelPròlegautor secundarialgunes edicionsconfirmat
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American juvenile justice system

City of Los Angeles v. Lyons

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This work argues that the War on Drugs and policies that deny convicted felons equal access to employment, housing, education, and public benefits create a permanent under caste based largely on race. As the United States celebrates the nation's "triumph over race" with the election of Barack Obama, the majority of young black men in major American cities are locked behind bars or have been labeled felons for life. Although Jim Crow laws have been wiped off the books, an astounding percentage of the African American community remains trapped in a subordinate status - much like their grandparents before them. In this incisive critique, former litigator-turned-legal-scholar Michelle Alexander provocatively argues that we have not ended racial caste in America: we have simply redesigned it. Alexander shows that, by targeting black men and decimating communities of color, the U.S. criminal justice system functions as a contemporary system of racial control, even as it formally adheres to the principle of color blindness. The New Jim Crow challenges the civil rights community - and all of us - to place mass incarceration at the forefront of a new movement for racial justice in America.

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