IniciGrupsConversesMésTendències
Cerca al lloc
Aquest lloc utilitza galetes per a oferir els nostres serveis, millorar el desenvolupament, per a anàlisis i (si no has iniciat la sessió) per a publicitat. Utilitzant LibraryThing acceptes que has llegit i entès els nostres Termes de servei i política de privacitat. L'ús que facis del lloc i dels seus serveis està subjecte a aquestes polítiques i termes.
Hide this

Resultats de Google Books

Clica una miniatura per anar a Google Books.

S'està carregant…

Chatterton (1987)

de Peter Ackroyd

MembresRessenyesPopularitatValoració mitjanaMencions
7931520,488 (3.61)34
What is the mystery of Thomas Chatterton? A young poet and elderly female novelist try to decode the clues found within an 18th-century manuscript, only to discover that their investigation is disclosing other secrets for which there is no solution.
  1. 10
    The Forgery of Venus de Michael Gruber (Bookmarque)
    Bookmarque: while not as overtly loopy as Chatterton, the elements of the stories are similar - originality in art, personal delusions and shifting time periods from present to past.
  2. 00
    Headlong de Michael Frayn (KayCliff)
  3. 01
    What's Bred in the Bone de Robertson Davies (KayCliff)
S'està carregant…

Apunta't a LibraryThing per saber si aquest llibre et pot agradar.

No hi ha cap discussió a Converses sobre aquesta obra.

» Mira també 34 mencions

Es mostren 1-5 de 15 (següent | mostra-les totes)
Among other things, the jaunty eccentricities of certain characters were too much to bear. ( )
  KatrinkaV | May 13, 2020 |
Chatterton was a rising young poet, with everything to live for. However, it comes to light that the medieval poems that he had "discovered", he had , in fact, written himself. there's an echo here of the "Ossian" scandal. I think PA tried to walk into the later painting, and looking at the body from another angle, tried the greater experiment of asking himself, "If I was where Chatterton was, would I deal with the fear of further life the same way he did?" Another level is revealed that the painting was of a novelist named George Meredith, and it is not even of an imagined Chatterton. So we try to deal with what is deliberate, and what unconscious, art? this book requires rereads. ( )
  DinadansFriend | Oct 5, 2013 |
"I am here, listen to me!" is what Peter Ackroyd, the author, seems to say. He says it rather well mind you and he's quite talented in his technical and emotional writing skills. Nevertheless we have here a book about the author himself, cleverly veiled as a treatise about what is real and what isn't, what is genuine and what is fake, and most of all: how important is suffering for one's craft and convictions?

We meet down and out Charles, a poet suffering from terrible headaches. He lives with his wife and son a very meager existence. We also meet Thomas Chatterton (20 November 1752 – 24 August 1770) a poet of similar ilk who did obtain fame, or rather notoriety after it was discovered he forged many medieval poems. Finally we meet Henry Wallis (21 February 1830 – 20 December 1916), a painter who depicted Chatterton suicide some 80 years after the poet's death.

This work of magical realism, since that is truly what it is, weaves in and out of the main characters lives and draws parallels between various forms of art, be it poetry, prose, painting and even living. Charles discovers clues that Chatterton might have faked his own death. Chatterton himself struggles with his talent when he finds out his own creations are more welcome when given the pedigree of someone else. Various other characters in the novel struggle with the more traditional questions of what makes a painting real or genuine.

Peter Ackroyd serves up the question: what is genuine and what is not, and does the question even matter? The question is not new but is presented well in this novel. Quite frankly we're beaten over the head with it. That's quite alright since Ackroyd's writing style provides plenty of detail and intrigue to keep you reading.

Ackroyd's writing is also infuriating. Not being an initiate into British literature and art I felt like I shouldn't be reading the text. Unless you get every alliteration, every reference and every quip the author throws around you will most likely feel you haven't studied hard enough to be worthy of this novel. In a way the book reminded me of The Crying of Lot 49 by Thomas Pynchon, which is another novel where the author gets too carried away with his own cleverness and literary prowess. It makes me wonder if this was the reason the novel was so well received by the critics, it was almost as if they were thinking: we have no idea what he's talking about either but it sounds all so clever it must be good.

Admittedly the novel is a work of magical realism, but let's say that we take all the mysterious imagery and hallucinations away, would we have a deeply emotional work of art here? I'm hesitant to say yes for one particular reason. There is no objection against using bizarre behavior if it serves a purpose. But some of the events and acts the characters perform clash so much with the reality the book creates that you wonder sometimes if you've read the words correctly.

If it weren't for the literary stunts and incomprehensible character behavior I would have given this novel 5 stars. ( )
  TheCriticalTimes | Jan 27, 2013 |
I believe I have read this book once before many years ago, but I honestly couldn't remember anything about it. In one strand of the story, we follow young Thomas Chatterton with his literary ambititions, in another we are in the modern day with two writers, a painting from a junk shop, and different forms of forgery, and the end result was interesting enough. ( )
  mari_reads | Nov 21, 2011 |
A complicated meditation on literary reality and originality, forgery and fakery, Peter Ackoyd's Chatterton (Grove Press, 1996) combines a trio of narratives: in the present day, failed poet Charles Lutwyche finds a portrait and papers suggesting Thomas Chatterton might not have actually killed himself in 1770; in the 1850s, painter Henry Wallis uses poet George Meredith as his model for Chatterton's death scene; and Chatterton himself, over the course of his short (or was it?) life.

As Lutwyche investigates his discoveries, he accidentally finds that his sometime employer, novelist Harriet Scrope, might have done a little "borrowing" in a couple of his own novels, adding another dimension to Ackroyd's treatment.

While many of the characters are rather forgettable, and the Wallis/Meredith section doesn't work quite as well as it might, overall I liked the playful complexity of the novel, and one of the sub-plots (featuring Lutwyche's sometime employer, novelist Harriet Scrope) was great fun.

http://philobiblos.blogspot.com/2011/09/book-review-chatterton.html ( )
  JBD1 | Sep 2, 2011 |
Es mostren 1-5 de 15 (següent | mostra-les totes)
The structure of the book is as complex and doubling-back as the subject demands, with Charles Wychwood, the bewitched poet of our times, haunted by henna-haired Chatterton (himself best known, since the demise of interest in his middle-ages forgeries, as a beautiful suicide, painted by Henry Wallis in 1856 with George Meredith as the model for 'the marvellous boy').
afegit per KayCliff | editaThe Guardian, Emma Tennant (Sep 11, 1987)
 
Chatterton is at once a hilariously witty comedy; a thoughtful and dramatic exploration of the deepest issues of authenticity in both life and art; and a subtle and touching story of failed lives, parental love, doomed marriages, and erotic passions.
 

Pertany a aquestes col·leccions editorials

Has d'iniciar sessió per poder modificar les dades del coneixement compartit.
Si et cal més ajuda, mira la pàgina d'ajuda del coneixement compartit.
Títol normalitzat
Títol original
Títols alternatius
Data original de publicació
Gent/Personatges
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Llocs importants
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Esdeveniments importants
Pel·lícules relacionades
Premis i honors
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Epígraf
Dedicatòria
Primeres paraules
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
"Come," he said. "Let us take a walk into the meadow."
Citacions
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
I learned how to give my own Papers the semblance of Antiquity. Into my Closet I smuggl'd a pounce bag of Charcole, a great stick of yellow ochre and a bottle of black lead powder, with which Materials I could fabricate an appearance of great Age as closely as if my new invented Papers were the very ones from the Chests of St Mary Redcliffe. I would rub the ochre and lead across the Parchments and sometimes, to antiquate my Writings still further, I would drag them through the Dust or hold them above a Candle - which process not only quite chang' d the colour of the Inke but blackened and contracted the Parchment itself. I was a willing Student but, at first, there was more madness than method in my labours; and my Mother, hearing sundry Groans and Curses coming from my Chamber on the fust Day that ever I tried them, entered and found me in a clowd of Charcole. I was so cover'd in ochre and in lead that she threw up her hands, saying 'Lord, Tom, do you colour yourself to join the Gypsies?'
For him the pleasure of painting rested in formal execution and not in imaginative exploration, in mimesis rather than invention.
Darreres paraules
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
(Clica-hi per mostrar-ho. Compte: pot anticipar-te quin és el desenllaç de l'obra.)
Nota de desambiguació
Editor de l'editorial
Creadors de notes promocionals a la coberta
Informació del coneixement compartit en anglès. Modifica-la per localitzar-la a la teva llengua.
Llengua original
CDD/SMD canònics

Referències a aquesta obra en fonts externes.

Wikipedia en anglès

No n'hi ha cap

What is the mystery of Thomas Chatterton? A young poet and elderly female novelist try to decode the clues found within an 18th-century manuscript, only to discover that their investigation is disclosing other secrets for which there is no solution.

No s'han trobat descripcions de biblioteca.

Descripció del llibre
Sumari haiku

Dreceres

Cobertes populars

Valoració

Mitjana: (3.61)
0.5
1
1.5
2 12
2.5 7
3 37
3.5 10
4 49
4.5 4
5 20

Ets tu?

Fes-te Autor del LibraryThing.

 

Quant a | Contacte | LibraryThing.com | Privadesa/Condicions | Ajuda/PMF | Blog | Botiga | APIs | TinyCat | Biblioteques llegades | Crítics Matiners | Coneixement comú | 157,049,335 llibres! | Barra superior: Sempre visible