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The Victory with No Name: The Native American Defeat of the First American Army

de Colin G. Calloway

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994277,217 (4.08)6
"A balanced and readable account of the 1791 battle between St. Clair's US forces and an Indian coalition in the Ohio Valley, one of the most important and under-recognized events of its time"-- "In 1791, General Arthur St. Clair led the United States Army in a campaign to destroy a complex of Indian villages at the Miami River in northwestern Ohio. Almost within reach of their objective, St. Clair's 1,400 men were attacked by about one thousand Indians. The U.S. force was decimated, suffering nearly one thousand casualties in killed and wounded, while Indian casualties numbered only a few dozen. But despite the lopsided result, it wouldn't appear to carry much significance; it involved only a few thousand people, lasted less than three hours, and the outcome, which was never in doubt, was permanently reversed a mere three years later. Neither an epic struggle nor a clash that changed the course of history, the battle doesn't even have a name. Yet, as renowned Native American historian Colin Calloway demonstrates here, St. Clair's Defeat--as it came to be known--was hugely important for its time. It was both the biggest victory the Native Americans ever won, and, proportionately, the biggest military disaster the United States had suffered. With the British in Canada waiting in the wings for the American experiment in republicanism to fail, and some regions of the West gravitating toward alliance with Spain, the defeat threatened the very existence of the infant United States. Generating a deluge of reports, correspondence, opinions, and debates in the press, it produced the first congressional investigation in American history, while ultimately changing not only the manner in which Americans viewed, raised, organized, and paid for their armies, but the very ways in which they fought their wars. Emphasizing the extent to which the battle has been overlooked in history, Calloway illustrates how this moment of great victory by American Indians became an aberration in the national story and a blank spot in the national memory. Calloway shows that St. Clair's army proved no match for the highly motivated and well-led Native American force that shattered not only the American Army but the ill-founded assumption that Indians stood no chance against European methods and models of warfare. An engaging and enlightening read for American history enthusiasts and scholars alike, The Victory with No Name brings this significant moment in American history back to light"--… (més)
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Es mostren totes 4
This is an ok book for what it does; however one thing that it isn't, and the title appears to suggest that this is a detailed narrative of the battle of the 4th November 1791. It isn't, and in fact if one is looking for that one would be better served looking for the journals of some of the participants (Sargent, Denny, or the Swearingen-Bedinger papers to name several). It is a decent overview of the period, however and it has some good maps to give an overall sense of the direction of the campaigns (it includes more than just St Clair's), however it is more of an overview as opposed to anything else. ( )
  southerncross116 | Sep 11, 2021 |
A well written and well sourced account of "St. Clair's Defeat" and its aftermath, though I would have liked a bit more about the scandals which ensued after the defeat, and about the news coverage of the debacle around the young country. Still, an excellent overview of the matter, and well worth a read. ( )
  JBD1 | Sep 23, 2017 |
Through and well-written account of the disastrous defeat of Arthur Sinclair's U.S. army (the only field army at the time) by the Miami Confederacy. This account begins in 1790 with background on the Native/US rivalry for the Ohio country, and covers Harmer's and Sinclair's defeats and Wayne's victory at Fallen Timbers It makes a serious effort to be or balanced than earlier accounts, giving, so far as evidence exists, the Native as well as the U.S. side, and on the U.S. side making clear that over-eager land speculators and corrupt army supplies contributed as much to the defeat as any alleged cowardice of the soldiers. ( )
  antiquary | Apr 19, 2016 |
Using the first major defeat of the U. S. Army against a confederation of tribes from the "Ohio" region as a backdrop for the relations between the new nation and the Native population of the recently acquired Northwest Territories, Calloway presents a well research and documented story. Author has a bibliography of primary and secondary sources. ( )
  Waltersgn | Dec 28, 2015 |
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"A balanced and readable account of the 1791 battle between St. Clair's US forces and an Indian coalition in the Ohio Valley, one of the most important and under-recognized events of its time"-- "In 1791, General Arthur St. Clair led the United States Army in a campaign to destroy a complex of Indian villages at the Miami River in northwestern Ohio. Almost within reach of their objective, St. Clair's 1,400 men were attacked by about one thousand Indians. The U.S. force was decimated, suffering nearly one thousand casualties in killed and wounded, while Indian casualties numbered only a few dozen. But despite the lopsided result, it wouldn't appear to carry much significance; it involved only a few thousand people, lasted less than three hours, and the outcome, which was never in doubt, was permanently reversed a mere three years later. Neither an epic struggle nor a clash that changed the course of history, the battle doesn't even have a name. Yet, as renowned Native American historian Colin Calloway demonstrates here, St. Clair's Defeat--as it came to be known--was hugely important for its time. It was both the biggest victory the Native Americans ever won, and, proportionately, the biggest military disaster the United States had suffered. With the British in Canada waiting in the wings for the American experiment in republicanism to fail, and some regions of the West gravitating toward alliance with Spain, the defeat threatened the very existence of the infant United States. Generating a deluge of reports, correspondence, opinions, and debates in the press, it produced the first congressional investigation in American history, while ultimately changing not only the manner in which Americans viewed, raised, organized, and paid for their armies, but the very ways in which they fought their wars. Emphasizing the extent to which the battle has been overlooked in history, Calloway illustrates how this moment of great victory by American Indians became an aberration in the national story and a blank spot in the national memory. Calloway shows that St. Clair's army proved no match for the highly motivated and well-led Native American force that shattered not only the American Army but the ill-founded assumption that Indians stood no chance against European methods and models of warfare. An engaging and enlightening read for American history enthusiasts and scholars alike, The Victory with No Name brings this significant moment in American history back to light"--

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